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How can I generate a string in SQL which contains an empty string: ' '

I tried this:

DECLARE @TEST NVARCHAR(50), @COL1 NVARCHAR(50), @COL2 NVARCHAR(50) SELECT @COL1 = 'A', @COL2 = 'B'

SELECT @TEST = 'SELECT '' ['+ @COL1 + '], ''[' + @COL2+ ']'

SELECT @TEST

But the string ends up looking like:

SELECT ' [A], '[B]

When it needs to look like:

SELECT '' [A], ''[B]

Thanks.

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2  
You need to learn about: 1. SQL Injection and 2. Parameterized Queries –  Oded Dec 15 '11 at 18:40

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Two single quotes in a string in SQL is treated as a single escaped single quote, so in order to generate two in the output, you need to put 4 in the input, like so:

SELECT @TEST = 'SELECT '''' ['+ @COL1 + '], '''' [' + @COL2+ ']'
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Thank you - that worked! –  Rivka Dec 15 '11 at 18:33

Well, the quick answer is: '''' (double them up)

e.g. SELECT 'XX''''XX'XX''XX

I'll leave it at that, because the "why would you want to do that‽" part makes me very nervous.

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You don't need to concatenate strings.

SELECT @COL1, @COL2

should be sufficient. The parameters @COL1 and @COL2 will be replaced by the actual values automatically.

However you cannot declare column names dynamically like this. The parameters on stand for values. Usually you would do something like this:

SELECT [Name] FROM mytable WHERE ID=@id 

If you intend to change the column names dynamically, then you would not use apostrophes at all:

SET @sql = 'SELECT [' + @COL1 + '], [' + @COL2 + ' FROM mytable';
EXECUTE sp_executesql @sql;
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Thanks, but I'm trying to generate a SQL string, which will select an empty string along with column aliases (parameters) when executed. I don't want to merely select the parameter values. –  Rivka Dec 15 '11 at 18:46

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