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OK,

I'm trying to make a app that has a Scratch off feature (like scratch off tickets from the loto).

I've been digging around and can not find the a way to tell how much of my canvas is covered by my parent/color. See what i want is that they have to uncover x% of the background image before they can "click" to claim.

I did find the answer to the original question. but a new one has come up dealing with the same thing.

when calculating out the percent "int percent = (trans_count / max_count) * 100;" it always returns 0 and in the my app the max_count is always 90000 (because of the picture size and my androids screen).

Here is my current code.

class TouchView extends ImageButton {
    public Boolean Clickable = false;


    private Bitmap bgr = null;
    private Bitmap overlayDefault;
    private Bitmap overlay;
    private Paint pTouch;
    private int X = -100;
    private int Y = -100;
    private Canvas c2;

    public TouchView(Context context) { super(context);  build();}

    public TouchView(Context context, AttributeSet attrs) { super(context, attrs); build(attrs); }

    public TouchView(Context context, AttributeSet attrs, Integer params) { super(context, attrs, params);   build(attrs);}

    private void build()
    {
        bgr = BitmapFactory.decodeResource(getResources(),R.drawable.loser);
        overlayDefault = BitmapFactory.decodeResource(getResources(),R.drawable.over);
        overlay = BitmapFactory.decodeResource(getResources(), R.drawable.over).copy(Config.ARGB_8888, true);

        pTouch = new Paint(Paint.ANTI_ALIAS_FLAG);
        pTouch.setXfermode(new PorterDuffXfermode(Mode.SRC_OUT));
        pTouch.setColor(Color.TRANSPARENT);
        pTouch.setMaskFilter(new BlurMaskFilter(2, Blur.NORMAL));
        pTouch.setStrokeWidth(20);
    }

    private void build(AttributeSet attrs)
    {
        bgr = BitmapFactory.decodeResource(getResources(),R.drawable.loser);
        overlayDefault = BitmapFactory.decodeResource(getResources(),R.drawable.over);
        overlay = BitmapFactory.decodeResource(getResources(), R.drawable.over).copy(Config.ARGB_8888, true);

        pTouch = new Paint(Paint.ANTI_ALIAS_FLAG);
        pTouch.setXfermode(new PorterDuffXfermode(Mode.SRC_OUT));
        pTouch.setColor(Color.TRANSPARENT);
        pTouch.setMaskFilter(new BlurMaskFilter(2, Blur.NORMAL));
        pTouch.setStrokeWidth(20);
    }

    public void setAsWinner() {
        bgr = BitmapFactory.decodeResource(getResources(), R.drawable.winner);
    }

    @Override
    public boolean onTouchEvent(MotionEvent ev) {
        int sX = X;
        int sY = Y;
        switch (ev.getAction()) {
            case MotionEvent.ACTION_DOWN: {
                X = (int) ev.getX();
                Y = (int) ev.getY();
                invalidate();
                c2.drawCircle(X, Y, 5, pTouch);
                break;
            }
            case MotionEvent.ACTION_MOVE: {
                X = (int) ev.getX();
                Y = (int) ev.getY();
                invalidate();
                c2.drawLine(sX, sY, X, Y, pTouch);
                break;
            }
            case MotionEvent.ACTION_UP:
                X = (int) ev.getX();
                Y = (int) ev.getY();
                invalidate();
                c2.drawLine(sX, sY, X, Y, pTouch);
                break;
        }

        try
        {
            int pixels[] = new int[(overlay.getWidth() * overlay.getHeight())];
            overlay.getPixels(pixels, 0, overlay.getWidth(), 0, 0, overlay.getWidth(), overlay.getHeight());
            int max_count = pixels.length;
            int trans_count = 0;

            for(int i = 0 ; i < max_count; i++)
            {
                if (pixels[i] == 0)
                    trans_count++;
            }

            int percent = (trans_count / max_count) * 100;

            if (percent > 60)
            {
                Clickable = true;
            }
        }
        catch (IllegalArgumentException e)
        {
            Log.i ("info", e.getMessage());
        }
        catch (ArrayIndexOutOfBoundsException e)
        {
            Log.i ("info", e.getMessage());
        }

        return true;
    }


    @Override
    public void onDraw(Canvas canvas) {
        super.onDraw(canvas);

        // draw background
        if (bgr != null)
            canvas.drawBitmap(bgr, 0, 0, null);

        if (c2 == null)
        {
            int width = overlay.getWidth();
            int height = overlay.getHeight();

            RectF bounds = new RectF(canvas.getClipBounds());

            float scaleWidth = bounds.width() / width;
            float scaleHeight = bounds.height() / height;

            // create a matrix for the manipulation
            Matrix matrix = new Matrix();
            // resize the bit map
            matrix.postScale(scaleWidth, scaleHeight);


            overlay = Bitmap.createBitmap(overlay,0, 0, width, height, matrix, true);
            c2 = new Canvas(overlay);
        }

        canvas.drawBitmap(overlay, 0, 0, null);
    }

}
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1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

trans_count and max_count are integers so java performs integer division when you do trans_count/max_count and the result is 0 because trans_count is smaller than max_count. What you want is floating point division, you can force it like this:

double percentage = 100.0 * trans_count / max_count;

Basically what will happen is that 100.0 * trans_count will get executed first giving a floating point value (because one of the values is floating point), then the result will be divided by max_count again giving a floating point value.

share|improve this answer
    
You know this actually odd to me. I've done percentage calculation on a number of languages and this is the first time i've had to do it this way. –  Pyromanci Dec 15 '11 at 22:04
    
Most languages do that because integer division is usually what you want. Maybe trans_count or max_count was already a floating point value for some reason in the other cases? –  obrok Dec 15 '11 at 22:06
    
no, though more often then not a simple cast to double would solve problems in other languages. But this time around i tired a varity of casts and layouts and it always ended up 0. –  Pyromanci Dec 16 '11 at 12:47
    
You can do it with a cast like this: ((double) trans_count) / max_count * 100 –  obrok Dec 16 '11 at 13:55

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