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I'm wondering if there is a more efficient way to do this, from a CPU time standpoint:

/*
* Returns a string in the form of "n days, x hours, y minutes"
* */

public static String getFormattedDateDifference(DateTime startDate, DateTime endDate) {
    Period p = new Period(startDate, endDate,
            PeriodType.standard().withSecondsRemoved().withMillisRemoved());
    return PeriodFormat.getDefault().print(p);
}
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You mean, other than just getting the timestamps in milliseconds and operate on them? –  fge Dec 15 '11 at 20:08
    
I don't care how it's done. Just something that's less expensive. I have to call this method frequently and its a CPU hog! –  LuxuryMode Dec 15 '11 at 20:12
1  
Of course, java calendar and swing dateformat. –  Stephan Dec 15 '11 at 20:12
    
Does any part of it consume more CPU than the others? Because you could probably cache both the PeriodType and the PeriodFormat somehow. Also, do you need different languages than English? –  millimoose Dec 15 '11 at 20:42

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

This, maybe?

private static final Pattern PATTERN = Pattern.compile(", $");

public static String getFormattedDateDifference(final DateTime startDate,
    final DateTime endDate)
{
    // This variable will ultimately contain the number of days
    long days = endDate.getMillis() - startDate.getMillis();

    final long hours, minutes;

    days /= 60000; // Forget seconds and milliseconds

    minutes = days % 60;  days /= 60;

    hours = days % 24; days /= 24;

    final StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder();

    if (days != 0) {
        sb.append(days).append(" day");
        if (days > 1)
            sb.append('s');
        sb.append(", ");
    }
    if (hours != 0) {
        sb.append(hours).append(" hour");
        if (hours > 1)
            sb.append('s');
        sb.append(", ");
    }
    if (minutes != 0) {
        sb.append(minutes).append(" minute");
        if (minutes > 1)
            sb.append('s');
        sb.append(", ");
    }

    return PATTERN.matcher(sb.toString()).replaceFirst("");
}

With this simple main(), it shows a more than double speedup:

public static void main(final String... args)
{
    final DateTime d = DateTime.now();

    final DateTime d2 = d.minus(Days.days(1)).minus(Minutes.minutes(3));

    long start, end;

    final int count = 5000;
    int i;

    start = System.currentTimeMillis();
    for (i = 0; i < count; i++)
        getFormattedDateDifference(d2, d); // <-- the original implementation
    end = System.currentTimeMillis();

    System.out.println(end - start);

    start = System.currentTimeMillis();
    for (i = 0; i < count; i++)
        getFormattedDateDifference2(d2, d); // <-- the implementation above
    end = System.currentTimeMillis();

    System.out.println(end - start);

    System.exit(0);
}

383 ms for the original function, 150 ms for mine.

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I can confirm that this cuts CPU time by more than half!! –  LuxuryMode Dec 15 '11 at 22:03

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