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In the following ruby module creates and stores an object in a hash, on appropriate method call...

include 'printer'

module A

  def create(params)
    temp = params
    @object = Printer.init(temp) #this returns a hash with a collection of objects
  end                            #{<object1>,<object2>,...}

end

also included file printer has a class called Printer that returns a hash by invoking a class method called init.

First : Does this module have a state ..? If yes why is it bad idea to have state and behavior together, isn't it inevitable ..?

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2  
state and behaviour can of course be mixed, but why would you use a module for that instead of a class? – riffraff Dec 15 '11 at 20:37
    
does it matter if we use a module or a class ... all i am looking for are just methods in the module to modify data. – pankajdoharey Dec 15 '11 at 20:48
5  
the reason for using a class is that then you can use a single instance for keeping data there. This means the state can be kept local to a single bit of code and you can eventually use other instances if the need arise. If you have stored data in the module you force all of the code to use a single global shared state, which leads to modularity, maintenability and extensibility problems. – riffraff Dec 15 '11 at 21:27
    
great Thats what i was looking for. Thanks. – pankajdoharey Dec 15 '11 at 21:45
    
Where did you hear that it's a bad idea to have state and behavior together? – Andrew Grimm Dec 15 '11 at 22:40

No, module in ruby have no state, their are juste about behavior. Class inherit from module, a class is behavior and state.

http://www.ruby-doc.org/core-2.0/doc/syntax/modules_and_classes_rdoc.html

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