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I want somewhere down in the java code:

if(inAnApplet()) {
    initForApplet();
} else {
    initForApp();
}
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1  
If main gets called, it's not an applet. Just save that state somewhere. – jli Dec 15 '11 at 20:39
    
@jli This is what I recall doing in the days-of-old (when Applets were cool for a few brief months ;-). I'm surprised there isn't a nifty technique these days with the advent of merging applets with JWS (or whatever it's really called). – user166390 Dec 15 '11 at 20:54
    
I am looking more fort a static global "system" way to get it. so I could put it in a static initializer. If I pass something in as an argument then I can differentiate. in the initial phace I might want to load one class or another depending on the context the VM is running in. – peterk Dec 15 '11 at 22:43
public class MyApplet extends JApplet {

    boolean isapplet = true;


    public MyApplet() {
        this(true);
    }

    public MyApplet(boolean isapplet) {
        this.isapplet = isapplet;
    }

    public static final void main(String[] argv) {
        // is an app
        new MyApplet(false);
    }
}
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Yeah, but it's probably better to encapsulate the behaviour rather than just have a flag. And separate the main and the Applet. – Tom Hawtin - tackline Dec 15 '11 at 22:52

Assuming that somewhere you have a view which extends JApplet and it is accessible from the code where you have the if, you can write:

if(mainView instanceof JApplet) {
     initForApplet();
} else {
     initForApp();
}
share|improve this answer
1  
Bad programming pitfalls exist in patterns like this. You wind up with classes that act differently based on types, but the code that depends on type is not encapsulated in the Class / Object it depends upon. It's like the opposite of encapsulation, and makes classes that aren't different types exhibit polymorphic behavior based on "other" classes types. Sure, people do it, but it's far from clean code. – Edwin Buck Dec 15 '11 at 20:59

Like jli said, maybe you could create initialise a public (static) boolean isApplet = true somewhere accessible in the class in which you would like to do the check and set that to false in your main method, as public static void main(String[] args) is not called in an Applet.

This way your check would simply start if(isApplet)!

HTH

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