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I have JSON which looks like:

{
    "fID": "00202020243123",
    "name": "John Doe",
    "List": ["Father", "Brother", "Cousin"]
}

I'm rendering this JSON element from my model, and inside of html, I can simply see the contents of the JSON. However, when I try to do it in a script, it does nothing.

What I'm trying to do is to take the List attribute and show it in unordered list in HTML.

Here is what i tried so far:

<script>
    $("input[name=loadmyJson]").click(function() {//on button click
        var items = [];
        var myJ = ${json}; //Json element i created in my controller
        var myVar = myJ.parseJSON();
        $.each(data, function(myVar) {
        items.push('<li>' + myVar.List + '</li>');
        });
        $('#myList').append( items.join('') );//myList is my unordered list's id.
    )};
</script>

EDIT: Do i need to add something for parseJSON() func?

share|improve this question
    
Aren't you missing the <ul> ... </ul> tags? Otherwise if you are sure myVar contains the JSON object then it seems correct. –  Masiar Dec 15 '11 at 21:37
    
What's your question? Looks like a reasonable approach. Where is it going wrong? –  graphicdivine Dec 15 '11 at 21:39
    
what is the data variable ?? jQuery.each takes your array / Object and runs it throw returning arguments(key, value) to your callback function see: stackoverflow.com/a/8526958/887539 –  null Dec 15 '11 at 21:39
    
Actually nothing is going on, i put the <ul> tag, i guess @AndreasAL has a point, let me try the suggested answers. –  LuckySlevin Dec 15 '11 at 21:41
    
actually after looking up from the Firebug, @Masiar, myJ contains json string, but in the phase of parseJSON there is sth wrong i guess, i'm not sure myVar truly has the parsed json –  LuckySlevin Dec 15 '11 at 21:54

5 Answers 5

what about:

var myVar = myJ.parseJSON();
$.each(myVar.List, function(key, value) {
        items.push('<li>' + value + '</li>');
    });
    $('#myList').append( items.join('') );//myList is my unordered list's id.
)};

??

As descriped In my comment jQuery.each has the arguments key and value. the variable this is equal to the value (arguments[1]).

Same as jQuery("selector").each has the arguments key and element where the variable this is equal to the element (arguments[1]).

OKAY:

var myVar = myJ.parseJSON();

also has to be replaced with:

var myVar = jQuery.parseJSON(myJ);

sorry for not seeing it :)

share|improve this answer
    
i tried this still nothing, i guess there is sth wrong in parseJSON func –  LuckySlevin Dec 15 '11 at 21:56
    
Are you sure it is a string ? Try changing the line to var myVar = myJ; Maybe you are working with an Object already.? –  null Dec 15 '11 at 21:57
    
i'm sure it is string. Do i need to add something for parseJSON func? a js file or etc? –  LuckySlevin Dec 15 '11 at 22:06
    
lol... it's jQuery.parseJSON(myJ); –  null Dec 15 '11 at 22:07

You want to loop through the List array that's on your object.

var myVar = myJ.parseJSON();
$.each(myVar.List, function(index, el) {
    items.push('<li>' + el + '</li>');
});
share|improve this answer
    
does it make any sense to use this instead of the second argument? normally people uses this for DOM elements in jQuery(selector).each(... –  null Dec 15 '11 at 21:47
    
@AndreasAL - I think either would be equivalent. I used this here so I could omit the function's parameters. If OP were wiring up events and needing the current item in the callback, then definitely, you'd need the second parameter, since this will change meaning in the callback. But for here I just figured it was a bit slimmer / cleaner –  Adam Rackis Dec 15 '11 at 21:49
    
It way a matter of understanding . A said before normally people combines this (in jQuery context) being a DOM element we need to wrap in $() thats why is maybe misleading to use is when we are working with a variable. (Especially in jQuery.each so simmulary to jQuery(..).each) :) –  null Dec 15 '11 at 21:54
    
@AndreasAL - you're right. this can be confusing for beginners. I updated to use the index and element arguments to the each function. Thanks :) –  Adam Rackis Dec 15 '11 at 21:55
    
think you mean value ?? .. instead of el –  null Dec 15 '11 at 21:56

You can just add it straight away, something like:

var parent = $("#myList");
$.each(myJ.parseJSON().List, function() {
    $("<li></li>").html(this).appendTo(parent);
});
share|improve this answer

Write less code

Here's some HTML

<pre></pre>

Then this bit of javascript

$('pre').text( JSON.stringify(mJ, null, "\t") );

It will render your JSON just like this

{
    "fID": "00202020243123",
    "name": "John Doe",
    "List": [
        "Father",
        "Brother",
        "Cousin"
    ]
}

Finally, you can use something like jQuery Snippet to make it look pretty

$('pre').snippet('javascript');
share|improve this answer

I would seriously look into a templating engine like json2html (which specializes in converting json to html) for jquery. Makes life much easier than trying to write your own methods to build html from a source json object.

Note that I changed the List from an array of strings to objects instead (makes it easier to access)

<script type="text/javascript" src="http://ajax.googleapis.com/ajax/libs/jquery/1.7.1/jquery.min.js"></script>
<script type="text/javascript" src="http://json2html.com/js/jquery.json2html-2.3-min.js"></script>

<div id='list'></div>

<script>
var json =
{
    "fID": "00202020243123",
    "name": "John Doe",
    "List": [{label:"Father"}, {label:"Brother"},{label:"Cousin"}]
};
var transform = {tag:'span',html:'.label'};

$('#list').json2html(json.List, transform);
</script>
share|improve this answer

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