Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I want to create a list of type class which has properties which I can add to.

Also to be able to access these properties?

Here's what I have so far.

public class Class1 
{
    enum Player
    {
        Me,
        Opponent
    }

    public class MovesMade
    {
        Player Peep = new Player { };
        //Other properties here
    }

    List<MovesMade> AllMoves = new List<MovesMade> {};

    public void MyFunc() 
    {
        AlllMoves.Add ??

        if (AllMoves.Peep == Player.Me) {

        } 
    }
}
share|improve this question
3  
You're probably going to have to clear this up. It doesn't make much sense. – Will Dec 15 '11 at 21:59
up vote 0 down vote accepted

To make a property of a class accessible outside of itself, mark it public. Here is your example modified a bit to get you started.

public class Class1 
{
    public enum Player
    {
        Me,
        Opponent
    }    

    List<MovesMade> AllMoves = new List<MovesMade> {};

    public void MyFunc() 
    {
        MovesMade movesMade = new MovesMade();
        movesMade.Peep = Player.Me;
        AlllMoves.Add(movesMade);

        if (movesMade.Peep == Player.Me) {

        } 
    }
}

public class MovesMade
{
    public MovesMade(){

    }
    public Player Peep { get; set; }
    //Other properties here
}
share|improve this answer
    
This is my problem I get 'Error 1 Inconsistent accessibility: property type 'Class1.Player' is less accessible than property 'Class1.MovesMade.Peep' – Jules Dec 15 '11 at 22:06
    
Mark the Enum public – Gabe Dec 15 '11 at 22:06
2  
You most certainly can have a class within another class. – Daniel Mann Dec 15 '11 at 22:10
    
yes, classes can be defined in other classes – Erix Dec 15 '11 at 22:10
    
Cool. Now I'm getting Error 1 The name 'AlllMoves' does not exist in the current context. – Jules Dec 15 '11 at 22:16

Try this:

 MovesMade m = new MovesMade();
 m.Peep = new Player();
 m.Peep.Name = "foo";

 AlllMoves.Add(m);

 foreach(var moves in AlllMoves)
 {
    if (moves.Peep.Name = "Jules")
    {
    }
 }
share|improve this answer
  1. Your property is not well declared. Instead of

    public class MovesMade
    {
        Player Peep = new Player { };
    }
    

    Do:

    public class MovesMade
    {
        public Player Peep { get; set; }
    }
    
  2. To add a new MovesMade to the list, call your constructor:

    AllMoves.Add(new MovesMade());
    
  3. If you want to set Peep directly when adding, either create a constructor that takes a Player:

    AllMoves.Add(new MovesMade(Player.Opponent));
    

    or use an object initializer:

    AllMoves.Add(new MovesMade() { Peep = Player.Opponent });
    
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.