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Let's suppose we have some array called A.

let Π be a set of (x,y) pairs, where x,y are values that exist in the array of A and index(x) < index(y) and x>y.

so for example if we had this array

      3 2 9 8 3 0

then (3,2) will be in Π. (3,0) will also be in Π.

all the pairs in Π will be the following

   { (3,2), (3,0), (8,0), (9,0),(9,3),(2,0),(8,3),(9,8) }

I hope I haven't forgotten something

I realize that if we fix all these pairs, then we will sort the array. When I say fix I mean, for example (3,2) make it (2,3) and for the others as well

what I don't understand is, how many pairs at each step does bubble sort fix? my teacher told me 1 and I don't understand this

let's run bubble sort

 3 2 9 8 3 0
 2 3 9 8 3 0
 2 3 9 8 3 0
 2 3 8 9 3 0
 2 3 8 3 9 0
 2 3 8 3 0 9

 2 3 8 3 0 9
 2 3 8 3 0 9
 2 3 3 8 0 9
 2 3 3 0 8 9

 2 3 3 0 8 9
 2 3 3 0 8 9
 2 3 0 3 8 9

 2 3 0 3 8 9
 2 0 3 3 8 9

 0 2 3 3 8 9

aren't there some steps where bubble sort doesn't fix anything? So, is the correct answer that bubble sort will only fix at most 1 point in every step?

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2 Answers

It looks to me that in your example dataset, bubble-sort will always "fix" exactly one element, because each element is out of order. If, however, you were to move the 0 closer to the front of the original list, then you would generate some pairs that are already in sorted order. These pairs would not be "fixed" by bubble-sort, and in such a case you would be correct in saying that bubble sort may "fix" up to 1 element on each step.

So in the general case, you are correct. In the specific case you used in your example, the teacher is correct.

Note: I am assuming that "step" refers to the application of the bubble-sort algorithm to a single pair of numbers in the set.

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Aroth, thanks for the answer. In this case: 2 3 3 0 8 9 2 3 3 0 8 9 there isn't any change though. Does it depend on the implementation? –  John John Dec 15 '11 at 23:25
    
Maybe I'm not understanding your question correctly. Are you running bubble-sort on the list of numbers, or the pairs in the list of pairs? If the former, then what do the pairs have to do with anything? Also I'm not sure how "fixing" all the pairs also sorts the list. Your set of pairs contains more numbers than the list, and even if each pair is fixed the first number in the resulting set would be 2, not 0. –  aroth Dec 15 '11 at 23:33
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Bubble sort involves looping through the array repeatedly. During each pass through the array, it repeatedly swaps adjacent elements that are out of order when it hits them.

Each step from one entry to another swaps only if the elements are out of order.

Each pass through the array will fix at least one out-of-order pair unless there are none (i.e., the array is already sorted, and getting through a pass with no change is the completion signal).

I suspect you're thinking of steps and your professor is thinking of passes, but he's not quite right anyway, as some passes through the entire array can fix more than one out-of-order pair and the last pass fixes nothing (since nothing needs fixing at that point).

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