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I'm developing something in asp.net and finally got round to creating the UI. I made a basic <div> element to wrap the content of my body in, and I notice that it auto fills the width to 100%. I create a new .aspx page to test it in, and the same results happen. So I create the following HTML document in notepad, save it as test.html and run it through Chrome, IE and Firefox and all three are returning a strip of 20px high and 100% width with a red background. Here's the code:

<head>
    <style type="text/css">
        #tester
        {
            height: 20px;
            background-color: Red;
            border: 1px;
        }
    </style>
</head>

<body>
    <div id="tester">

    </div>
</body>

Would anyone know what I could have done to make this so that it auto fills div elements to width: 100% on all browsers? I guess it's possible that I'm being absent minded and forgot that div elements did this automatically, but I'm 99% sure they didn't.

Thank you kindly, Ben

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Isn't that what you want? –  xuc Dec 15 '11 at 23:33
    
sorry, i really don't understand your question - please rephrase –  ptriek Dec 15 '11 at 23:36
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3 Answers

From CSS 101 (BSD/MIT licences):

The horizontal position and size of a non-floating, block-level element is determined by seven properties:

  • margin-left
  • border-left
  • padding-left
  • width
  • padding-right
  • border-right
  • margin-right

The sum of these seven properties is always equal to the 'width' of the parent element.

So yes, you've been absent-minded! Block-level elements (such as div) automatically fill the width of their parent unless they've been told not to by float.

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Or if you explicitly change them to inline or inline-block elements! –  Wex Dec 16 '11 at 2:28
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<div>s are block-level elements, meaning they will automatically fill the horizontal space of their parent. Unlike inline elements such as <span>, which only take up the space required by their content.

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DIVS are by default 100% of their parent element. So just set the width you need.

Also note that DIVs that have a width greater than their parent will by default also be completely visible unless you set the parent element to overflow:hidden.

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