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So far I am trying with:

var myBoolean = false; // global

function toggleBoolean(vr) {
    vr = !vr;
}

alert(myBoolean); // false
toggleBoolean(myBoolean);
alert(myBoolean); // false

But obviously, It failed.

Edit: sorry, I forgot to point out that I want the function to work with many Booleans and not just one

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3 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Yes, you can toggle a global boolean from a function. You can't do it as in your attempt because JavaScript is strictly call-by-value.

function toggleBoolean() {
  myBoolean = ! myBoolean;
}

Now, if you want to toggle a global by name, you could do this (though it's a little icky):

function toggleBoolean(name) {
  window[ name ] = ! window[ name ];
}

Global variables (in JavaScript on a browser) are properties of the global object, which is known as "window". In other contexts there are ways of associating a name with the global context. You'd call that function, therefore, like this:

toggleBoolean( "myBoolean" );

Note that I pass a string there instead of a reference to the actual global variable.

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the second one is what I am looking for. Thanks –  user1022373 Dec 16 '11 at 0:01
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you are passing the value to the function by value. Instead, to achieve what you want, you can do something like:

var myBoolean=false;// Global

function toggleBoolean(){
    myBoolean = !myBoolean;
} 
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sorry, I forgot to point out that I want the function to work with many Booleans and not just one –  user1022373 Dec 16 '11 at 0:05
    
Pointy's answer suits your needs in that case :) –  Akhil Dec 16 '11 at 0:19
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You can do

var myState = { state : false };

function toggleBoolean( s )
{
    s.state = ! s.state;
}

alert( myState.state );
toggleBoolean( myState );
alert( myState.state );

primitives are passed by value by default in javascript. You can have a wrapper object and pass the object to the toggle function.

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sorry, I forgot to point out that I want the function to work with many Booleans and not just one –  user1022373 Dec 16 '11 at 0:06
    
If it is many booleans you can add them all to myState = { s1 : false , s2 : false } etc –  parapura rajkumar Dec 16 '11 at 0:07
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