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I'm calculating the difference between 2 dates for which there are many differing examples available. The time returned is in milliseconds so I need to convert it into something more useful.

Most examples are for days:hours:minutes:seconds or hours:minutes, but I need days:hours:minutes so the seconds should be rounded up into the minutes.

The method I'm currently using gets close but shows 3 days as 2.23.60 when it should show 3.00.00 so something is not quite right. As I just grabbed the current code from an example on the web, I'm open to suggestions for other ways of doing this.

I'm obtaining the time in milliseconds by subtracting a start date from an end date as follows:-

date1 = new Date(startDateTime);
date2 = new Date(endDateTime);
ms = Math.abs(date1 - date2)

I basically need to take the ms variable and turn in into days.hours:minutes.

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2  
Care to share some code? –  Ayman Safadi Dec 16 '11 at 0:21
    
Sounds like "the method you are currently using" is almost right! Why not fix it? –  Alex Wayne Dec 16 '11 at 0:22
    
Can you post some code for what you are doing? It definitely looks like you're doing it wrong. Also, check out stackoverflow.com/questions/1056728/… –  austinfromboston Dec 16 '11 at 0:25

7 Answers 7

up vote 8 down vote accepted

Something like this?

function dhm(t){
    var cd = 24 * 60 * 60 * 1000,
        ch = 60 * 60 * 1000,
        d = Math.floor(t / cd),
        h = Math.floor( (t - d * cd) / ch),
        m = Math.round( (t - d * cd - h * ch) / 60000),
        pad = function(n){ return n < 10 ? '0' + n : n; };
  if( m === 60 ){
    h++;
    m = 0;
  }
  if( h === 24 ){
    d++;
    h = 0;
  }
  return [d, pad(h), pad(m)].join(':');
}

console.log( dhm( 3 * 24 * 60 * 60 * 1000 ) );
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Many thanks Mic, out of all the examples I found your code the most reliable when throwing different values at it. Much appreciated. –  Mitch Dec 17 '11 at 14:27

Here you go:

http://jsfiddle.net/uNnfH/1

Or if you don't want to play with a running example, then:

window.minutesPerDay = 60 * 24;

function pad(number) {
    var result = "" + number;
    if (result.length < 2) {
        result = "0" + result;
    }

    return result;
}

function millisToDaysHoursMinutes(millis) {
    var seconds = millis / 1000;
    var totalMinutes = seconds / 60;

    var days = totalMinutes / minutesPerDay;
    totalMinutes -= minutesPerDay * days;
    var hours = totalMinutes / 60;
    totalMinutes -= hours * 60; 

    return days + "." + pad(hours) + "." + pad(totalMinutes);
}
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Thanks for your suggestion aroth, I ended up with many differing approaches and it was a close run thing which one I went with. I hadn't seen jsfiddle before so thanks for introducing me to it. –  Mitch Dec 17 '11 at 14:30

Dunno how many answers you need, but here's another - just another take on a few answers that have already been given:

function msToDHM(v) {
  var days = v / 8.64e7 | 0;
  var hrs  = (v % 8.64e7)/ 3.6e6 | 0;
  var mins = Math.round((v % 3.6e6) / 6e4);

  return days + ':' + z(hrs) + ':' + z(mins);

  function z(n){return (n<10?'0':'')+n;}
}

Take care with such calculations though, periods crossing daylight saving boundaries will cause issues. Always better to work in UTC and convert to local times for presentation.

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Thanks for the tip RobG, I'll bear it in mind. –  Mitch Dec 17 '11 at 14:28

"The time returned is in milliseconds so I need to convert it into something more useful."

Are you getting the time back from a server or is this pure javascript?

Some code would really help. "Something useful" is kind of vague.

Here is an example, I think this is what you are talking about.

<script type="text/javascript">

//Set the two dates
var millennium =new Date(2000, 0, 1) //Month is 0-11 in JavaScript
today=new Date()
//Get 1 day in milliseconds
var one_day=1000*60*60*24

//Calculate difference btw the two dates, and convert to days
document.write(Math.ceil((today.getTime()-millennium.getTime())/(one_day))+
" days has gone by since the millennium!")

</script>
4367 days has gone by since the millennium!
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There was no year 0. You should use 1/1/2001 as your reference date. –  aroth Dec 16 '11 at 0:38

Without code, it's hard to tell exactly which error you have, but I suspect you're doing exactly as you said: rounding up. If rounding down is not good enough for you, here's how to round to closest:

var time = date.getTime();
if (time % 60000 >= 30000) time += 60000;

and then continue with the calculation.

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Sounds like a job for Moment.js.

var diff = new moment.duration(ms);
diff.asDays();     // # of days in the duration
diff.asHours()     // # of hours in the duration
diff.asMinutes();  // # of minutes in the duration

There are a ton of other ways to format durations in MomentJS. The docs are very comprehensive.

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Dont know why but the others didn't worked for me so here is mine

 function dhm(ms){
    jours = Math.floor(ms / (24*60*60*1000));
     joursms=ms % (24*60*60*1000);
     heures = Math.floor((joursms)/(60*60*1000));
     heuresms=ms % (60*60*1000);
     minutes = Math.floor((heuresms)/(60*1000));
     minutesms=ms % (60*1000);
     sec = Math.floor((minutesms)/(1000));
     return jours+":"+heures+":"+minutes+":"+sec;
 }

 alert(dhm(500000));
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