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My gut feeling is that this isn't possible but I'm no expert. Here's what I would like to do:

#define KEY(i) #if (i == 0) KeyClassA(arg.fieldA)
               #elif (i == 1) KeyClassB(arg.fieldB)
//...
#endif

//inside a function with given arg
for(int i = 0; i < N; i++) {
    Data* data = array[i]->find(KEY(i));
    //do things with data
}

That code is obviously more pseudo-code than C++ code and I personally don't think anything like this will compile, but my intention should be clear: provide a temporary class object to the find function according to the appropriate data structure in the array. That is, each data structure in the array requires a different key matching class.

Macro text replacement seems like the "cleverest" way to attempt to achieve this but I would obviously welcome any other ideas to get something like this to work.

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I don't understand. What exactly is in your array? Why have you chosen to put these particular things into an array together? What problem are you trying to solve by "key matching" a different thing from each element? –  Karl Knechtel Dec 16 '11 at 2:37
    
@KarlKnechtel Without getting too specific, here's my situation: –  itchy23 Dec 16 '11 at 13:03
    
@KarlKnechtel I have a templated DataStructure class that takes a comparing function for inserting and removing data and that accepts another similar function for finding the data. Sending a kind of copy of the data to find and then using the initially given compare function to find the data seems like a waste in comparison to just providing a function to do that. In my implementation I require 4 DataStructure<DataStructure<SimpleStruct>> so those go into an array, which each get sorted by fields in SimpleStruct but not the same ones. –  itchy23 Dec 16 '11 at 13:12

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Macro text replacement is a non-solution to your problem because the index i is known only at runtime. Macros are processed before compilation even begins.

If N is not known at compile-time, then you will need to use some combination of conditional structures and possibly a loop. If the number of KeyClass*es are fixed (which appears to be the case), you may be able to do something like this:

void Foo(int N, Array& array, const Bar& arg)
{
    if(N > 3 || N <= 0) return;
    Data* data = array[0]->find(KeyClassA(arg.fieldA));
    // DoSomething(data);
    if(N == 1) return;
    data = array[1]->find(KeyClassB(arg.fieldB));
    // DoSomething(data);
    if(N == 2) return;
    data = array[2]->find(KeyClassC(arg.fieldC));
    // DoSomething(data);
}

Put all the common code in the DoSomething() function (preferably using a better function name) so you don't repeat yourself for all possible valid values for N.

If N is known at compile-time however, you can simply unroll the loop.

void Foo(Array& array, const Bar& arg)
{
    Data* data = array[0]->find(KeyClassA(arg.fieldA));
    // DoSomething(data);
    data = array[1]->find(KeyClassB(arg.fieldB));
    // DoSomething(data);
    data = array[2]->find(KeyClassC(arg.fieldC));
    // DoSomething(data);
}

You can even get fancy with template metaprogramming if you much rather not unroll the loop yourself, although this might be overkill for what you're doing:

// The basic idea using template specializations
template<int i> 
struct GetKey; 

template<> 
struct GetKey<0> 
{ 
    KeyClassA From(const Bar& arg) { return KeyClassA(arg.fieldA); } 
}; 

template<> 
struct GetKey<1> 
{ 
    KeyClassB From(const Bar& arg) { return KeyClassB(arg.fieldB); } 
}; 

template<> 
struct GetKey<2> 
{ 
    KeyClassC From(const Bar& arg) { return KeyClassC(arg.fieldC); } 
}; 

template<int i, int N>
struct Iterate
{
    static void Body(Array& array, const Bar& arg)
    {
        Data* data = array[i]->find(GetKey<i>().From(arg));
        // DoSomething(data);
        Iterate<i+1, N>::Body(array, arg);
    }
};

template<int N>
struct Iterate<N, N>
{
    static void Body(Array& array, const Bar&) {}
};

void Foo(Array& array, const Bar& arg)
{
    Iterate<0, 3>::Body(array, arg);
}
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That's how I have it now and it's ugly (lots of duplicate commands) but I may be able to make a helper function that could do most of the work that gets done for every data node. –  itchy23 Dec 16 '11 at 0:52
    
@itchy23: Right. That's why there's a DoSomething() function, so you can put all the common code in it. –  In silico Dec 16 '11 at 0:53
    
And yes N is known at compile time. –  itchy23 Dec 16 '11 at 0:55
    
I probably should have made the example code a bit more specific to show the benefits of attempting the macro route but I'll make some changes and I should be able to pass it on to a common function. –  itchy23 Dec 16 '11 at 0:58
    
I just finished making auxiliary functions to clean up the code and everything looks much better and simpler and a lot less bloated than before but I like this new approach of yours as well. It's a little bit more to set up but I think it's exactly what I'm looking for. Nice one :) –  itchy23 Dec 16 '11 at 3:29

In this case it's not possible anyway because i isn't a compile-time constant. (not just a compile-time constant, but constant at the preprocessor stage)

So you will have to do it using normal C++ if-statements. (or a switch)

Based on what I think you are trying to do, using a loop will make it more complicated than it needs to be. Just write it all out and you don't need any loops or if-statements.

array[0]->find(arg.fieldA);
array[1]->find(arg.fieldB);
...

(you also don't seem to be doing anything with Data* data)

EDIT : With new information.

In this case, you can put the loop-body into a function call. Something like this:

void loop_body(KeyClass &key, /* other parameters */ ){
    Data* data = array[0]->find(key);

    //  Rest of the body
}

And just call it for each field.

loop_body(arg.fieldA);
loop_body(arg.fieldB);
...
share|improve this answer
    
That was a highly simplified version of what I need to do. There's another 10+ commands relating to data for each index. I'll edit the text to show that. –  itchy23 Dec 16 '11 at 0:47
    
I'm trying that now, might take a little tinkering at the moment. –  itchy23 Dec 16 '11 at 0:55

have you tried #define KEY(i) i?KeyClassB(arg.fieldB):KeyClassA(arg.fieldA)

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#define KEY(i) ((i) == 0 ? KeyClassA(arg.fieldA) : \
                (i) == 1 ? KeyClassB(arg.fieldB) :\
                ...)

The fact that this is a macro really doesn't buy you anything; the computation still must be done at run time, because it depends on the value of i.

This would make more sense as an inline function.

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