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Is there a way in Javascript to compare one integer with another through switch case structures without using if statements?

E.g.

switch(integer) {
    case 1 to 10:
        break;
    case 11 to 20:
        break;
    case 21 to 30:
        break;
}
share|improve this question
    
No. Well, you could have switch(integer < 10) { case true:....} (which is comparing an integer with another through switch) but I guess that's not helpful. –  Felix Kling Dec 16 '11 at 1:42
    
Ah ok. I asked because it would seem a lot easier to read and code than if(integer<= 10) and so forth. I've seen the syntax somewhere before, but I forget where and what for. –  Tommy Plummer Dec 16 '11 at 1:46

4 Answers 4

As stated in my comment, you can't do that. However, you could define an inRange function:

function inRange(x, min, max) {
    return min <= x && x <= max);
}

and use it together with if - else if. That should make it quite easy to read:

if(inRange(integer, 1, 10)) {

}
else if(inRange(integer, 11, 20)) {

}

//...
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You can do some math manipulations.

switch(Math.ceil(integer/10)) {
    case 1: // Integer is between 1-10
        break;
    case 2: // Integer is between 11-20
        break;
    case 3: // Integer is between 21-30
        break;
}
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That's awesome! Keeps the cases nice and simple. –  daGUY Feb 9 '12 at 17:34

There is a way, yes. I'm pretty sure I'd use an if/else structure in my own code, but if you're keen to use a switch the following will work:

switch(true) {
   case integer >= 1 && integer <= 10:
      // 1-10
      break;
   case integer >= 11 && integer <= 20: 
      // 11-20
      break;
   case integer >= 21 && integer <= 30:
      // 21-30
      break;
}

Of course if you wanted to avoid having to code >= && <= on every case you could define your own isInRange(num,min,max) type function to return a boolean and then say:

switch (true) {
   case isInRange(integer,1,10):
      // 1-10
      break;
   // etc
}
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Posting for "cool" syntax :P

if( integer in range(0, 10 ) ) {

}
else if ( integer in range( 11, 20 ) ) {



}
else if ( integer in range( 21, 30 ) ) {



}

function range( min, max ){
var o = {}, i ;
    for( i = min; i <= max; ++i ) {
    o[i] = !0;
    }
return o;
}
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1  
Why is o[i] = !0 better than o[i] = true? For being cool? ;) Creating an object like this every time seems to be a waste, but using in this way is creative I have to admit (though probably not very performant). –  Felix Kling Dec 16 '11 at 1:52
    
@FelixKling yeah :D Not really meant for any real use unless you must have that sweet integer in range syntax –  Esailija Dec 16 '11 at 1:54
2  
I give you a "virtual" +1 for creativity ;) –  Felix Kling Dec 16 '11 at 1:55
    
Uh, what an anti-pattern... :P –  Šime Vidas Dec 16 '11 at 2:00

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