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Here is a piece of my program. Have a look.

For[m = 1, m <= mode1, m++,
  For[n = 0, n <= mode2, n++,
    A[m, n][t_] = a[m, n]*Cos[\[Omega]*t];
    B[m, n][t_] = b[m, n]*Cos[\[Omega]*t];
  ]
]

temp = 0;
For[m = 1, m <= mode1, m++,
  For[n = 0, n <= mode2, n++,
    temp++;
    equation[temp] = 
      ExpandAll[Integrate[eqC[m, n]*Cos[\[Omega]*t], {t, 0, (2*Pi)/\[Omega]}]];
    equation[temp] = ExpandAll[Simplify[equation[temp]/10^9]];
    Print["\n\nEquation ", temp, "-\n", equation[temp]];
    temp++;
    equation[temp] = 
      ExpandAll[Integrate[eqS[m, n]*Cos[\[Omega]*t], {t, 0, (2*Pi)/\[Omega]}]];
    equation[temp] = ExpandAll[Simplify[equation[temp]/10^9]];
    Print["\n\nEquation ", temp, "-\n", equation[temp]];
  ]
]

After running of this code I am supposed to get few equations and then create a matrix out of it by a series of differentiations. I know that the matrix must come out to be symmetric. The problem is that when I enter simple data i.e. e=1,h=1, etc. I get accurate results and the matrix is symmetric, but as soon as I give the real data which have values like 71.02e9,0.000247 the calculations come out to be wrong and I get an unsymmetric matrix. I have thoroughly checked the code and cannot find a single mistake on my part. I have also checked the results of the program for a simple case with manual calculations.

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1  
Your post doesn't really contain a clear question, nor have you provided enough information for us to run your code (which is not written in the normal Mathematica style - it's too imperative). However, your problem is probably just loss of precision. The two "real data" values you gave will be interpreted as MachinePrecision numbers. Either use exact numbers or bump the precision up to say 30 by using 71.02`30*^9 and 0.000247`30. You should also try to use the built-in Fourier transform functions –  Simon Dec 16 '11 at 5:43
1  
So you've got all these As and Bs at the start but not in the next block. And you refer to e=1 and h=1 even though e and h aren't anywhere in the code. At a guess it looks like you are trying to solve for Fourier series coefficients or something??? –  Mike Honeychurch Dec 16 '11 at 5:51
    
Yes I agree that the code that I have written might not be the most elegant way to program in mathematica. I am actually new to the language. I am not trying to develop a Fourier transform, I am solving a partial differential equation of shell vibration using galerkin's method. Also the 'e' and the 'h' are actually in the eqC[m,n] and eqS[m,n] which have been declared earlier. –  Harmeet Singh Dec 16 '11 at 12:01
    
Let me rephrase what Mike asked, what variables in the above code are you setting to your "real values?" It is not clear which ones they are. –  rcollyer Dec 16 '11 at 12:20
1  
The ExpandAll[Simplify step just after the previous ExpandAll seems superfluous to me. You can add the division by 10^9 directly to the first step. –  Sjoerd C. de Vries Dec 16 '11 at 12:35

2 Answers 2

You can try and increase the precision of your calculations by globally setting, e.g., $MinPrecision=50 and specifying your data values to a high precision using either foo = SetPrecision[0.000247,50] or using the shorthand 0.000247`50.

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As a further alternative you could use Rationalize[0.000247] and then derive a numerical quantity later with N[expr, prec]. In M- if you give inexact input you get inexact output and for exact input you get exact output.

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