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This is a strange one. A web application which runs fine on Windows Server 2000, experiences intermittent errors on Windows Server 2003 R2. By intermittent, I mean myself and 2 testers can find the error within 5 minutes of navigating around the web application.

The error is always "Division by zero" - 800a000b

The most common line of code it fails on is in an include file. The line is:

Response.ExpiresAbsolute = Now() - 10

Once I change it to:

Response.Expires = 0

I cannot get the error on that page anymore. However, I then start to get the error on other pages. So far, I've had the following lines of code report the error:

nSearchPos = CLng((nLBound + nUBound) / 2)

and

next

I am currently creating an 'R1' instance of Windows Server 2003, to see if I can reproduce it on this server.

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up vote 1 down vote accepted

If you Google for this you'll see lots of people with similar issues. I'm not sure I have a good answer, but this...

http://blogs.msdn.com/dougste/archive/2008/11/12/random-and-unexpected-exception-flt-divide-by-zero-and-exception-flt-invalid-operation.aspx

... has some reasoning behind why the problem occurs. Do you have 3rd party components running that could be causing the issue?

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the info. I was obviously googling on the wrong thing! That's pretty low level stuff for a web developer. I will get some other devs involved and try to figure out what may have changed, and then post an update. – Greg Woods May 12 '09 at 15:46
    
FYI I Googled "800a000b division zero" – Martin Peck May 12 '09 at 16:01

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