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What is a void pointer and what is a null pointer?

I often see code which resembles something like the following:

void * foo(int bar);

What does this mean? Does it mean that it can return anything? Is this similar to dynamic or object in C#?

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marked as duplicate by pst, user7116, Chris, Sam Miller, Wiseguy Dec 16 '11 at 5:28

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
A link to similar question: stackoverflow.com/questions/4334831/… –  ksming Dec 16 '11 at 5:17
    
It has no relationship with dynamic and is only a gross "similarity" with object. –  user166390 Dec 16 '11 at 5:18
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4 Answers 4

up vote 13 down vote accepted

A void* does not mean anything. It is a pointer, but the type that it points to is not known.

It's not that it can return "anything". A function that returns a void* generally is doing one of the following:

  • It is dealing in unformatted memory. This is what operator new and malloc return: a pointer to a block of memory of a certain size. Since the memory does not have a type (because it does not have a properly constructed object in it yet), it is typeless. IE: void.
  • It is an opaque handle; it references a created object without naming a specific type. Code that does this is generally poorly formed, since this is better done by forward declaring a struct/class and simply not providing a public definition for it. Because then, at least it has a real type.
  • It has explicit documentation telling you what type(s) that you can use the pointer for.

It is nothing like dynamic or object in C#. Those constructs actually know what the original type is; void* does not. This makes it far more dangerous than any of those, because it is very easy to get it wrong.

And on a personal note, if you see code that uses void*'s "often", you should rethink what code you're looking at. void* usage, especially in C++, should be rare, used primary for dealing in raw memory.

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A void* pointer is used when you want to indicate a pointer to a hunk of memory without specifying the type. C's malloc returns such a pointer, expecting you to cast it to a particular type immediately. It really isn't useful until you cast it to another pointer type. You're expected to know which type to cast it to, the compiler has no reflection capability to know what the underlying type should be.

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A void* can point to anything (it's a raw pointer without any type info).

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Any pointer can point to anything. –  Seth Carnegie Dec 16 '11 at 5:21
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Void is used as a keyword. The void pointer, also known as the generic pointer, is a special type of pointer that can be pointed at objects of any data type! A void pointer is declared like a normal pointer, using the void keyword as the pointer’s type:

General Syntax:

void* pointer_variable;

void *pVoid; // pVoid is a void pointer

A void pointer can point to objects of any data type:

int nValue;
float fValue;

struct Something
{
    int nValue;
    float fValue;
};

Something sValue;

void *pVoid;
pVoid = &nValue; // valid
pVoid = &fValue; // valid
pVoid = &sValue; // valid

However, because the void pointer does not know what type of object it is pointing to, it can not be dereferenced! Rather, the void pointer must first be explicitly cast to another pointer type before it is dereferenced.

int nValue = 5; void *pVoid = &nValue;

// can not dereference pVoid because it is a void pointer

int *pInt = static_cast(pVoid); // cast from void* to int*

cout << *pInt << endl; // can dereference pInt

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In C++ those last three lines would cause a compilation error because you have to explicitly cast things to void*, unlike C . –  Seth Carnegie Dec 16 '11 at 5:29
    
However, because the void pointer does not know what type of object it is pointing to, it can not be dereferenced! Rather, the void pointer must first be explicitly cast to another pointer type before it is dereferenced. int nValue = 5; void pVoid = &nValue; // can not dereference pVoid because it is a void pointer int *pInt = static_cast<int*>(pVoid); // cast from void to int* cout << *pInt << endl; // can dereference pInt –  User1988 Dec 16 '11 at 5:54
    
Void Pointer : Void Pointer is a pointer which points to the specific location of memory which is of it's own type. This pointer is firstly introduced by 'ANSI'. Null Pointer: Null Pointer is a pointer which doesn't point to any location of memory. A null pointer always has zero value. –  User1988 Dec 16 '11 at 6:00
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