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I have a list, that looks like this in python:

ex = ['(1..3),(5..8)']

I need to get out the list like this:

[(1, 3), (5, 8)]

I tried using the replace function, but could only get like ['(1, 3), (5,8)'] and could not lose the ' marks.

Hope someone can help me.

Thanks

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Are you trying to convert that string into a list of tuples or just another string representation? –  jdi Dec 16 '11 at 7:14
1  
You're trying to change a string to some tuples. You can't do that with replacing string contents. Try something like eval. –  John Doe Dec 16 '11 at 7:14

4 Answers 4

up vote 8 down vote accepted
import ast
ex = ['(1..3),(5..8)']
list(ast.literal_eval(ex[0].replace('..', ',')))
# returns [(1, 3), (5, 8)]

ast.literal_eval is safe. eval is not.

For your updated question:

ex2 = ['(2..5)', '(7..10)']
[ast.literal_eval(a.replace('..', ',')) for a in ex2]
# returns [(2, 5), (7, 10)]
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You are truly Dutch. ;) –  Karl Knechtel Dec 16 '11 at 7:33
    
Thx for the quick answer, this was just what I was looking for. And now comes the twist. What is my input list looks like this now: ex2 = ['(2..5)', '(7..10)']. Then I can not just use the ex[0] like above, but have to get both. –  X-Pender Dec 16 '11 at 8:11
    
@X-Pender - here you are ;-) –  eumiro Dec 16 '11 at 8:50
    
Again you provide me with a beautiful answer :) Just to make sure I understand this properly: do I now have a list with tuples, or just a list containing "(" and ")"? I hope you understand what I mean. Is it possible to get out only the number 2 fx from the list created? –  X-Pender Dec 16 '11 at 10:13
    
@X-Pender - [(2, 5), (7, 10)] is a list of tuples of integers. You can access its elements: result[0][1] == 2. Just start ipython, paste the lines into it and try yourself. –  eumiro Dec 16 '11 at 10:24

if your format is constant, this should work :

  >>> n = list(eval(ex[0].replace("..",",")))
  >>> n
  [(1, 3), (5, 8)]

UPDATE : using literal eval ( safer ):

import ast
result = list(ast.literal_eval(ex[0].replace("..",",")))
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1  
It's best not to use eval directly if possible, an alternative for literals is literal_eval from ast, also this doesnt work if ex only has one element. –  Doboy Dec 16 '11 at 7:20
1  
And just for future reference (to OP), always remember that it is UNSAFE to eval a string that a user can manipulate in any way. You can do safe eval using ast.literal_eval()‌​. Edit: @Doboy: Beat me to it! –  John Doe Dec 16 '11 at 7:22
    
@JohnDoe Thanks for the improvement . –  DhruvPathak Dec 16 '11 at 7:25
    
Wish I could downvote but not enough rep yet. Eval is evil. –  gb. Dec 16 '11 at 10:32
    
@gb. yes you can, I should have replaced it with literal_eval. –  DhruvPathak Dec 16 '11 at 10:59

This became uglier than I expected:

In [26]: ex = ['(1..22),(3..44)']

In [27]: [tuple([int(i) for i in s.strip('()').split('..')])
          for s in ex[0].split(',')]
Out[27]: [(1, 22), (3, 44)]
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+1 because this is a general approach that has the virtue of making the form of the input string explicit. Parsing errors are also more explicit, with this method. I find the regex approach to be a tad more explicit, though. –  EOL Dec 16 '11 at 9:58
    
Thanks. I agree, this solution is hackish and confusing, but I guess it answers the question. –  Steve Tjoa Dec 16 '11 at 10:15

Look like some regex task.

>>> import re
>>> ex = ['(1..3),(5..8)']
>>> re.findall(r'\((\d+)\.\.(\d+)\)', ex[0])
[('1', '3'), ('5', '8')]
>>> # if you want tuple of numbers
... [tuple(map(int, x)) for x in _]
[(1, 3), (5, 8)]
share|improve this answer
    
+1: the form of each pair is explicit and quite clear. However, this parsing does not put many constraints on the input string, and might therefore let some bugs pass silently (for example, (1..3) xxx (5..8) 12, 3 is accepted even though it does not have the right format). –  EOL Dec 16 '11 at 10:01

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