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suppose I have n1 and n2 I want to multiply them for example I have array

n1={1,2,3};

and in

n2={5,6}   

they are two integers in n1 we have the 123 and in n2 56

123*56=6888

then in result I should have

result = {6,8,8,8}    

here is the incomplete algorithm which I thought

for(i in n1 bigger array)
    for(j in n2 smaller one)
    {
        mult=n1[i]*n2[j]
        mult+= carry;

        if(mult>=10)
        {
            carry = (mult/10);
            mult-= (carry*10);
        }
    }
}

How can I write it? I don't know the place of store after finishing the insider loop I should store num in array and then compute again and... How should I write it? I searched the whole of overflow here but I didn't find about it in c code

The Goal is to Compute the Large numbers Integer Numbers has 8 Bytes,in other words 64 bits so they can store 2pow64-1 which is 19 digits now this will help to compute very larger than 19 digits

share|improve this question
    
Thank You Mysticial – Nickool Dec 16 '11 at 7:18
    
Just out of curiosity, are you going to use it for arithmetic problems with HUGE numbers? – shinkou Dec 16 '11 at 7:34
    
Yes shinkou exactly I wrote the add and subtract with help of stackoverflow but they are in characters! I explained it in integers not to confuse all but this is exactly what I want – Nickool Dec 16 '11 at 7:42
    
should I call the size with something like sizeof? – Nickool Dec 16 '11 at 11:00
up vote 3 down vote accepted

It would be slightly easier if your digit-arrays were little-endian. Then your example multiplication would look

 3  2  1 * 6 5
---------------
18 12  6
   15 10  5
---------------
18 27 16  5    // now propagate carries
 8 28 16  5
 8  8 18  5
 8  8  8  6
============

The product of n1[i] and n2[j] would contribute to result[i+j]. The main loop could roughly look like

for (i = 0; i < l1; ++i) // l1 is length of n1
{
    for (j = 0; j < l2; ++j) // l2 is length of n2
    {
        result[i+j] += n1[i]*n2[j];
    }
}
// now carry propagation

You see that the result must be at least (l1-1) + (l2-1) + 1 long, since the product of the most significant digits goes int result[(l1-1) + (l2-1)]. On the other hand, n1 < 10^l1 and n2 < 10^l2, so the product is < 10^(l1+l2) and you need at most l1+l2 digits.
But if you're working with char (signed or unsigned), that will quickly overflow in each digit, since (for k <= min(l1-1,l2-1)) k+1 products of two digits (each can be as large as 81) contribute to digit k of the product.

So it's better to perform the multiplication grouped according to the result digit, accumulating in a larger type, and doing carry propagation on writing the result digit. With little-endian numbers

char *mult(char *n1, size_t l1, char *n2, size_t l2, size_t *rl)
{
    // allocate and zero-initialise, may be one more digit than needed
    char *result = calloc(l1+l2+1,1);
    *rl = l1 + l2;
    size_t k, i, lim = l1+l2-1;
    for (k = 0; k < lim; ++k)
    {
        unsigned long accum = result[k];
        for (i = (k < l2) ? 0 : k-(l2-1); i <= k && i < l1; ++i)
        {
            accum += (n1[i] - '0') * (n2[k-i] - '0');
        }
        result[k] = accum % 10 + '0';
        accum /= 10;
        i = k+1;
        while(accum > 0)
        {
            result[i] += accum % 10;
            accum /= 10;
            ++i;
        }
    }
    if (result[l1+l2-1] == 0)
    {
        *rl -= 1;
        char *real_result = calloc(l1+l2,1);
        for (i = 0; i < l1+l2-1; ++i)
        {
            real_result[i] = result[i];
        }
        free(result);
        return real_result;
    }
    else
    {
        result[l1+l2-1] += '0';
        return result;
    }
}

For big-endian numbers, the indexing has to be modified - you can figure that out yourself, hopefully - but the principle remains the same.

Indeed, the result isn't much different after tracking indices with pencil and paper:

char *mult(char *n1, size_t l1, char *n2, size_t l2, size_t *rl)
{
    // allocate and zero-initialise, may be one more digit than needed
    // we need (l1+l2-1) or (l1+l2) digits for the product and a 0-terminator
    char *result = calloc(l1+l2+1,1);
    *rl = l1 + l2;
    size_t k, i, lim = l1+l2-1;
    // calculate the product from least significant digit to
    // most significant, least significant goes into result[l1+l2-1],
    // the digit result[0] can only be nonzero by carry propagation.
    for (k = lim; k > 0; --k)
    {
        unsigned long accum = result[k]; // start with carry
        for (i = (k < l2) ? 0 : k-l2; i < k && i < l1; ++i)
        {
            accum += (n1[i] - '0') * (n2[k-1-i] - '0');
        }
        result[k] = accum % 10 + '0';
        accum /= 10;
        i = k-1;
        while(accum > 0)
        {
            result[i] += accum % 10;
            accum /= 10;
            --i;
        }
    }
    if (result[0] == 0) // no carry in digit 0, we allocated too much
    {
        *rl -= 1;
        char *real_result = calloc(l1+l2,1);
        for (i = 0; i < l1+l2-1; ++i)
        {
            real_result[i] = result[i+1];
        }
        free(result);
        return real_result;
    }
    else
    {
        result[0] += '0'; // make it an ASCII digit
        return result;
    }
}

Edit: added 0-terminators

Note: these are not NUL-terminated (unsigned) char arrays, so we need to keep length information (that's good to do anyway), hence it would be better to store that info together with the digit array in a struct. Also, as written it only works for positive numbers. Dealing with negative numbers is awkward if you only have raw arrays, so another point for storing additional info.

Keeping the digits as '0' + value doesn't make sense for the computations, it is only convenient for printing, but that only if they were NUL-terminated arrays. You may want to add a slot for the NUL-terminator then. In that case, the parameter rl in which we store the length of the product is not strictly necessary.

share|improve this answer
    
Nice One! let me Try – Nickool Dec 16 '11 at 10:34
    
I'm not familiar with size_t does it need something like typedef unsigned int size_t;?should I call the size with something like sizeof? – Nickool Dec 16 '11 at 10:59
    
size_t is a typedef'ed unsigned type, probably unsigned long. You can replace it with that. I don't understand the second question, the only type whose size matters here is (unsigned) char, and that's guaranteed to be 1. – Daniel Fischer Dec 16 '11 at 11:20
    
suppose I want to call this function in main how i should call it? – Nickool Dec 16 '11 at 11:34
    
unsigned char *product; /* ... */ product = mult(n1, l1, n2, l2, &length_product) where l1 and l2 are the lengths of n1, n2 respectively, length_product is a variable to store the length of the product in. – Daniel Fischer Dec 16 '11 at 11:39

Definitely an interesting problem.

Here was my thought:

  • For the given array, append each value to the end of a string. Thus you construct a string of the numbers in order. {1,2,3} = "123"
  • Then, you use a "ToInteger" method that you can find in one of the C libraries. Now you have your number to multiply with.

With this logic, you can probably look up how the "ToInteger" or "ToString" methods work with numbers, which would lead to an answer.

share|improve this answer
    
Good idea to apply lateral thinking - convert the arrays to integers; multiply; convert the result back into an array. – Jonathan Leffler Dec 16 '11 at 7:29
    
Terribly inefficient method. Instead of one conversion from array to int, you would be doing a conversion from array to string and then to int. – Lundin Dec 16 '11 at 7:30
    
Thank you the aim of this problem is computation for big integers I can store them in character and ... but the problem is that how to compute them when this works we can compute the Large numbers which has more than 19 digits which are in 8 bytes I mean (2 power 64)-1 – Nickool Dec 16 '11 at 7:32
    
@nik-parsa If you don't have to reinvent the wheel, take a look at gmplib.org or mpir.org – shinkou Dec 16 '11 at 7:36
    
I know there are libraries for doing it But I should reinvent the wheel. – Nickool Dec 16 '11 at 7:40

Think how you would do it on paper, since you are simulating multiplying two decimal numbers. For starters, I think you'd go from least significant to most significant digit, so you'd be counting down the indexes (2, 1, 0 for the larger array; 1, 0 for the smaller). Also, you'd somehow have to arrange that when you multiply by n2[0] (the 5 in 56), you start adding at the tens place, not the units.

share|improve this answer

You won't find complete C code for your problem at SO. Your first approach isn't that bad. You could do the following:

  1. Multiply n1 and n2, conversion is done by mulitplication and addition, i. e. a{1,2,3} -> 1*100 + 2*10 + 3*1, easy to implement
  2. Count the digits of your multiplication result (use division inside a loop)
  3. While looping through the digits you can store them back into another array

If you can't or if you don't want to deal with dynamic array allocation, then think about how big your array for storage must be beforehand and perform a static allocation.

Edit

Based on the discussion another approach:

Suppose, that r = n1 * n2

  1. Create a n*m 2D array, where
    • n = number of digits in n2
    • m = number of digits in n1 + 1
  2. Within a loop multiply each digit of n1 with one of the elements of n2, store the result in the array, store the result per-digit in the 2D-array, don't forget to add the carry to each digit
  3. Repeat 2 with all other digits of n2
  4. Now the array is filled and you'll have to add each digits like you would do it on paper, store each result within a target array, take care of the carry again

There is one thing left in the algorithm: Determine the size of the target array, based on the informations within the intermediate array, you can think about this by using pencil and paper ;)

share|improve this answer
    
You are right but suppose I want to get 20 digit number and multiply it in 30 digit number it will overflow by multiplying in Int Format – Nickool Dec 16 '11 at 7:47
    
I see, now i fully understand the approach of your algorithm. Then my answer isn't what you expected :D But i'll give it another thought. – Sebastian Dressler Dec 16 '11 at 7:54
    
I've made an edit with my additional thoughts, hope that helps. – Sebastian Dressler Dec 16 '11 at 8:05

This code isn't optimized, nor does it account for generic lengths of arrays/numbers, but it should give you the general idea of how to implement the algorithm:

(This is similar to string-to-int or int-to-string algorithms, just add the ASCII offset to each item of the array and you have it.)

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdint.h>

#define N1_N  3
#define N2_N  2
#define MAX_N 4 /* maximum array length allowed */

void     print_array     (const uint8_t* array, size_t size);
uint32_t array_to_ulong  (const uint8_t* array, size_t size);
size_t   ulong_to_array  (uint8_t*       array, size_t size, uint32_t val);

int main()
{
  uint8_t  n1[N1_N] = {1,2,3};
  uint8_t  n2[N2_N] = {5,6};
  uint8_t  n3[MAX_N];
  size_t   n3_size = MAX_N;
  uint32_t n1_int;
  uint32_t n2_int;
  uint32_t result;


  print_array(n1, N1_N);
  printf(" * ");
  print_array(n2, N2_N);

  n1_int = array_to_ulong (n1, N1_N);
  n2_int = array_to_ulong (n2, N2_N);

  result = n1_int * n2_int;
  printf(" = %d = ", result);

  n3_size = ulong_to_array (n3, n3_size, result);
  print_array(n3, n3_size);

  getchar();

  return 0;
}

void print_array (const uint8_t* array, size_t size)
{
  size_t i;

  printf("{");
  for(i=0; i<size; i++)
  {
    printf("%d", array[i]);
    if(i != size-1)
    {
      printf(", ");
    }
  }

  printf("}");
}

uint32_t array_to_ulong (const uint8_t* array, size_t size)
{
  uint32_t result = 0;
  uint32_t multiplier = 1;
  size_t   i;

  for(i=1; i<=size; i++)
  {
    result += array[size-i] * multiplier;
    multiplier *= 10;
  }


  return result;
}

size_t ulong_to_array (uint8_t* array, size_t size, uint32_t val)
{
  size_t i;

  for(i=1; i<=size && val!=0; i++)
  {
    array[size-i] = val % 10;
    val /= 10;
  }

  return i-1;
}
share|improve this answer

12345 * 6789 is: 12345 * 6 * 1000 + 12345 * 7 * 100 + 12345 * 8 * 10 + 12345 * 9 * 1

and that is: 1 * 6*1000 * 10000 + 2 * 6*1000 * 1000 + 3 * 6*1000 * 100 + 4 * 6*1000 * 10 + 5 * 6*1000 * 1 + 1 * 7*100 * 10000 + 2 * 7*100 * 1000 + 3 * 7*100 * 100 + 4 * 7*100 * 10 + 5 * 7*100 * 1 + 1 * 8*10 * 10000 + 2 * 8*10 * 1000 + 3 * 8*10 * 100 + 4 * 8*10 * 10 + 5 * 8*10 * 1 + 1 * 9*1 * 10000 + 2 * 9*1 * 1000 + 3 * 9*1 * 100 + 4 * 9*1 * 10 + 5 * 9*1 * 1

so the algorith is multiply each value by each value and add (cumulate) it to the appropriate result array element (1000 is 10^3 so array element 3 (array starting by zero)).

then move thru the result array and shift for results bigger than 10 the div by ten to the left (starting by the far right)

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#include<stdio.h>
#include<math.h>
#include<stdlib.h>
#include<string.h>
#define MAX 10000

char * multiply(char [],char[]);
int main(){
    char a[MAX];
    char b[MAX];
    char *c;
    int la,lb;
    int i;
    printf("Enter the first number : ");
    scanf("%s",a);
    printf("Enter the second number : ");
    scanf("%s",b);
    printf("Multiplication of two numbers : ");
    c = multiply(a,b);
    printf("%s",c);
    return 0;
}

char * multiply(char a[],char b[]){
    static char mul[MAX];
    char c[MAX];
    char temp[MAX];
    int la,lb;
    int i,j,k=0,x=0,y;
    long int r=0;
    long sum = 0;
    la=strlen(a)-1;
        lb=strlen(b)-1;

        for(i=0;i<=la;i++){
                a[i] = a[i] - 48;
        }

        for(i=0;i<=lb;i++){
                b[i] = b[i] - 48;
        }

    for(i=lb;i>=0;i--){
         r=0;
         for(j=la;j>=0;j--){
             temp[k++] = (b[i]*a[j] + r)%10;
             r = (b[i]*a[j]+r)/10;
         }
         temp[k++] = r;
         x++;
         for(y = 0;y<x;y++){
             temp[k++] = 0;
         }
    }

    k=0;
    r=0;
    for(i=0;i<la+lb+2;i++){
         sum =0;
         y=0;
         for(j=1;j<=lb+1;j++){
             if(i <= la+j){
                 sum = sum + temp[y+i];
             }
             y += j + la + 1;
         }
         c[k++] = (sum+r) %10;
         r = (sum+r)/10;
    }
    c[k] = r;
    j=0;
    for(i=k-1;i>=0;i--){
         mul[j++]=c[i] + 48;
    }
    mul[j]='\0';
    return mul;
}
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