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I still have some confusion about this thing. What I have found till now is

(Similar questions have already been asked here but I was having some other points.)

  1. Interface is collection of ONLY abstract methods and final fields.

  2. There is no multiple inheritance in Java.

  3. Interfaces can be used to achieve multiple inheritance in Java.

  4. One Strong point of Inheritance is that We can use the code of base class in derived class without writing it again. May be this is the most important thing for inheritance to be there.

Now..

Q1. As interfaces are having only abstract methods (no code) so how can we say that if we are implementing any interface then it is inheritance ? We are not using its code.

Q2. If implementing an interface is not inheritance then How interfaces are used to achieve multiple inheritance ?

Q3. Anyhow what is the benefit of using Interfaces ? They are not having any code. We need to write code again and again in all classes we implement it.

Then why to make interfaces ?

NOTE : I have found one case in which interfaces are helpful. One example of it is like in Runnable interface we have public void run() method in which we define functionality of thread and there is built in coding that this method will be run as a separate thread. So we just need to code what to do in thread, Rest is pre-defined. But this thing also can be achieved using abstract classes and all.

Then what are the exact benefits of using interfaces? Is it really Multiple-Inheritance that we achieve using Interfaces?

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5 Answers 5

Q1. As interfaces are having only abstract methods (no code) so how can we say that if we are implementing any interface then it is inheritance ? We are not using its code.

We can't. Interfaces aren't used to achieve multiple inheritance. They replace it with safer, although slightly less powerful construct. Note the keyword implements rather than extends.

Q2. If implementing an interface is not inheritance then How interfaces are used to achieve multiple inheritance ?

They are not. With interfaces a single class can have several "views", different APIs or capabilities. E.g. A class can be Runnable and Callable at the same time, while both methods are effectively doing the same thing.

Q3. Anyhow what is the benefit of using Interfaces ? They are not having any code. We need to write code again and again in all classes we implement it.

Interfaces are kind-of multiple inheritance with no problems that the latter introduces (like the Diamond problem).

There are few use-cases for interfaces:

  1. Object effectively has two identities: a Tank is both a Vehicle and a Weapon. You can use an instance of Tank where either the former or the latter is expected (polymorphism). This is rarely a case in real-life and is actually a valid example where multiple inheritance would be better (or traits).

  2. Simple responsibilities: an instance of Tank object in a game is also Runnable to let you execute it in a thread and an ActionListener to respond to mouse events.

  3. Callback interfaces: if object implements given callback interface, it is being notified about its life-cycle or other events.

  4. Marker interfaces: not adding any methods, but easily accessible via instanceof to discover object capabilities or wishes. Serializable and Cloneable are examples of this.

What you are looking for are trait (like in Scala), unfortunately unavailable in Java.

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Can you please elaborate benefits of using interfaces ? –  GPRathour Dec 16 '11 at 8:51
    
@GPSingh: I tried to add few points below Q3. Do you have some further questions? –  Tomasz Nurkiewicz Dec 16 '11 at 9:04
  1. The word "inheritance" is still frequently used when a class implements an interface, although "Interface Implementation" (as opposed to "Concrete Inheritance") would be preferable IMO. Plain "Inheritance" should be reserved for concrete inheritance (extends).

  2. You can get the 'effect' of multiple inheritance by implementing multiple interfaces on a class, and then implementing all methods, properties and events required of all the interfaces. One common technique of doing this with concrete classes is by doing 'has-a' (composition) relationships with classes which implement the external interfaces by 'wiring up' the implementation to each of the internal class implementations. Languages such as C++ do support multiple concrete inheritance directly.

  3. Interfaces allow existing classes (e.g. frameworks) to interact with your new classes without having ever 'seen' them before, because of the ability to communicate with a known interface. Think of an interface as a contract. By implementing this interface on a class, you are contractually bound to meet the obligations required of it.

A 'real world' example would be an electrical wall socket - it provides a common interface (line, neutral and earth) and an on / off switch, and there are some 'understood' conventions like the voltage, frequency and maximum current. But you can plug a fan, a kettle, or some new appliance to be invented next year into it, even though this appliance didn't exist when the interface was designed.

Interfaces are great for loose coupling of classes (See the Dependency Inversion Principle and Interface Segregation Principles of SOLID), and are widely used for Unit Testing and Dependency Injection purposes.

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up vote 4 down vote accepted

So from help of other users and my own research, what I got to know is: Interfaces are not there to achieve multiple inheritance in Java rather they are made to make any class behave in some specific manner. It is somewhat different concept than inheritance. For example,

interface Animal {
    public void eat();
    public void sleep();   
}

class Lion implements Animal {
    public void eat() {
        // Eat.
    }

    public void sleep(){
         // Sleep.
    }
}

class Monkey implements Animal {
    public void eat() {
        // Eat .
    }

    public void sleep() {
        // Sleep.
    }
}

So here we see that, we have one interface Animal. So any class that will implement this interface will become an Animal and also can have its own code of methods.

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Inheritance is when one class derives from another class (which can be abstract) or an Interface. The strongest point of object oriented (inheritance) is not reuse of code (there are many ways to do it), but polymorphism.

Polymorphism is when you have code that uses the interface, which it's instance object can be of any class derived from that interface. For example I can have such a method: public void Pet(IAnimal animal) and this method will get an object which is an instance of Dog or Cat which inherit from IAnimal. or I can have such a code: IAnimal animal and then I can call a method of this interface: animal.Eat() which Dog or Cat can implement in a different way.

The main advantage of interfaces is that you can inherit from some of them, but if you need to inherit from only one you can use an abstract class as well. Here is an article which explains more about the differences between an abstract class and an interface: http://www.codeproject.com/KB/cs/abstractsvsinterfaces.aspx

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KISS

I have searched for days, nay weeks trying to understand interfaces and seem to read the same generic help; I'm not trying to disparage the contributions, but i think the light-bulb just clicked so I'm chuffed :))

I prefer to Keep It Simple Stupid, so will proffer my new found view of interfaces.

I'm a casual coder but i want to post this code i wrote in VB.NET (the principle is the same for other languages), to help others understand interfaces.

If i have it wrong, then please let others know in follow up comments.

Explanation

Three buttons on a form, clicking each one saves a different class reference to the interface variable (_data). The whole point of different class references into an interface variable, is what i didn't understand as it seemed redundant, then its power becomes evident with the msgbox, i only need to call the SAME method to perform the task i need, in this case 'GetData()', which uses the method in the class that's currently held by the interface reference variable (_data).

So however i wish to get my data (from a database, the web or a text file), it's only ever done using the same method name; the code behind that implementation...i don't care about.

It's then easy to change each class code using the interface without any dependency...this is a key goal in OO and encapsulation.

When to use

Code classes and if you notice the same verb used for methods, like 'GetData()', then it's a good candidate to implement an interface on that class and use that method name as an abstraction / interface.

I sincerely hope this helps a fellow noob with this difficult principle.

Public Class Form1

Private _data As IData = Nothing

Private Sub Button1_Click(ByVal sender As System.Object, ByVal e As System.EventArgs) Handles Button1.Click
    _data = New DataText()
    MsgBox(_data.GetData())
End Sub

Private Sub Button2_Click(ByVal sender As System.Object, ByVal e As System.EventArgs) Handles Button2.Click
    _data = New DataDB()
    MsgBox(_data.GetData())
End Sub

Private Sub Button3_Click(ByVal sender As System.Object, ByVal e As System.EventArgs) Handles Button3.Click
    _data = New DataWeb()
    MsgBox(_data.GetData())
End Sub

End Class

Public Interface IData
Function GetData() As String
End Interface

Friend Class DataText : Implements IData

Friend Function GetData() As String Implements IData.GetData
    Return "DataText"
End Function

End Class

Friend Class DataDB : Implements IData

Friend Function GetData() As String Implements IData.GetData
    Return "DataDB"
End Function

End Class

Friend Class DataWeb : Implements IData

Friend Function GetData() As String Implements IData.GetData
    Return "DataWeb"
End Function

End Class
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