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So I have this code:

def self.age_to_bucket age
  age = age.to_i

  if age >= 0 && age <= 12
    1
  elsif age >= 13 && age <= 17
    2
  elsif age >= 18 && age <= 24
    3
  elsif age >= 25 && age <= 29
    4
  elsif age >= 30 && age <= 34
    5
  elsif age >= 35 && age <= 39
    6
  elsif age >= 40 && age <= 49
    7
  elsif age >= 50 && age <= 64
    8
  elsif age >= 65
    9
  else
    0
  end
end

How can I improve this code without losing its readability?

I know I can use #in? with ranges, like this:

if age.in? (0..12)

but #in? is in ActiveSupport, and I'd rather use more independent way.

share|improve this question
    
do you like this or it's too much abstraction? [0, 12, 13, 17, ...].find_interval(15) #=> 2. It's pretty easy to implement (a bit more difficult to do it efficiently). –  tokland Dec 16 '11 at 8:59
    
I mean: [0, 13, 18, ...].find_interval(15) –  tokland Dec 16 '11 at 9:05
    
I'd rather not implement anything myself, because I need this code only in one place. –  Sergio Tulentsev Dec 16 '11 at 9:08
    
fair enough, then use a case. It's a good programming exercise to implement it though. –  tokland Dec 16 '11 at 9:15

5 Answers 5

up vote 6 down vote accepted

One way is to use case

result = case age
 when 0..12 then 1
 when 13..17 then 2
 when 18..24 then 3
 when 25..29 then 4
 -------- so on
 else 0
end

Another way would be to eliminate the redundant && in the condition.

if age < 0 
  0
elsif age < 13
  1
elsif age < 18
  2
elsif age < 25
  3
elsif age < 30
  4
elsif age < 35
  5
elsif age < 40
  6
elsif age < 50
  7
elsif age < 65
  8
else
  9

UPD: the final version of the code as a result of all advices in this topic: https://gist.github.com/1485288

share|improve this answer
    
how would you express age > 65 in case case? –  Sergio Tulentsev Dec 16 '11 at 9:06
1  
(65..Float::INFINITY). Create your own infinity for 1.8: infinity = 1.0/0 –  tokland Dec 16 '11 at 9:15
    
Current version looks like this: gist.github.com/1485288 Much better, imho. Thanks, guys. –  Sergio Tulentsev Dec 16 '11 at 9:24
def self.age_to_bucket age
  case age=age.to_i
    when  0..12 then 1
    when 13..17 then 2
    when 18..24 then 3
    when 25..29 then 4
    when 30..34 then 5
    when 35..39 then 6
    when 40..49 then 7
    when 50..64 then 8
    else age >= 65 ? 9 : 0
  end
end
share|improve this answer

You can rewrite if age.in? (0..12) to (0..12).include? age, which is vanilla Ruby.

share|improve this answer
    
yeah, but it looks worse :-) –  Sergio Tulentsev Dec 16 '11 at 9:05

Just for fun (this is not the efficient way, but for small arrays is just fine):

ranges = [0, 13, 18, 25, 30, 35, 40, 50, 65, Float::INFINITY].each_cons(2).map { |a, b| (a..b) }
n = ranges.map.with_index { |range, idx| idx if range.include?(15) }.compact.first + 1 
#=> 2

Note that if the intervals were dynamic you'd have to implement it in a similar fashion.

share|improve this answer
    
Now that's a "smart" and concealing code :-) –  Sergio Tulentsev Dec 16 '11 at 9:30
1  
@Sergei: "concealing" in the sense that's not as "clear" a static case, ok, but programmatically you'll need to do something similar. Programming is about writing abstractions, don't fear them. map.with_index is valid Ruby 1.9. –  tokland Dec 16 '11 at 9:35
    
Yeah, I mean, for my case of static intervals this is an overly complicated solution. Dynamic intervals is another story. –  Sergio Tulentsev Dec 16 '11 at 9:49
irb(main):010:0> a = {1 => 0..12, 2 => 13..17} # insert other values here
=> {1=>0..12, 2=>13..17}
irb(main):011:0> age = 16
=> 16
irb(main):012:0> a.keys.find {|k| a[k].include?(age) }
=> 2
share|improve this answer
    
what about 'elsif age >= 65' case, how you will make this range? –  megas Dec 16 '11 at 9:03
    
Check for nil and add an if test. –  Tempus Dec 16 '11 at 9:33

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