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I have a project targeted to multiple platform. I have to change UI codes for different platform while keeping core classes same. To achieve this, I thought to make git branches for different platform.

Given the above scenario my requirement is, if I make changes in core classes it should be reflected in all git branches.

How to achieve this?

Or is there any other workflow to achieve the same?

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Are you satisfied with the answers? Could you accept any of the answers or have you any mentions about them? –  lig Dec 17 '11 at 18:26
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@Lig: Ya am satisfied, and thank you very much. Am using your suggested work flow and also figuring (experimenting) out + and - point of using git branch for my required working pattern. :) –  Anji Jan 7 '12 at 23:05
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2 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Via git rebase

You may handle your specific platform via git rebase instead of git merge. In this case you will be able to change core branch and than rebase other branches on it keeping platform specific modifications applied over core.

Example workflow.

Make platform branches

git checkout master
git checkout -b platform1

git checkout master
git checkout -b platform2

Make core modifications

git checkout master
# make modification
git commit

Make platform modifications

git checkout platform2
# make modification
git commit

Import core changes in platforms

git checkout platform1
git rebase master

git checkout platform2
git rebase master

Via git merge

It is also possible to use git merge with strategy option as said in git merge manual.

git checkout platform2
git merge -s recursive -X ours

This will always choose platform specific changes in case of conflicts.

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but isn't it possible to use git merge to achieve the same result? –  Alexis Dec 16 '11 at 11:31
    
@Alexis yes. it is possible. I've updated my answer to include the explanation. –  lig Dec 16 '11 at 13:21
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There is no such thing in git.

If you are really after git solution, I suggest creating a "common" branch and have all your branches merge from that.

Always commit changes to common code to the "common" branch and merge that to platform branches, so you will prevent conflicts and merging things you do no want (or you can cherry-pick.)

Also I think you could make the commons file read-only on platform branches to prevent modifying it without being slapped.

CONS: Tedious, but should work.

Alternatively, use different subdirectories for each platform and let your build system pull in the right files for each build.

CONS: You won't get merges as with git branches.

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There is everything inside git. You just need to know how to get it from git. –  lig Dec 16 '11 at 9:02
    
I do not see much difference between proposed merge and rebase solution except rebase will not work well with upstream (git push) and will screw up history. –  Martian Dec 17 '11 at 21:36
    
Martian it's up to repository maintainer to decide what solution to use. "merge" solution will result in unpleasant history look that will a bit harder to understand. "rebase" solution will result in over writing history, you are right, but it represents exactly the platform specific branch mean. All platform specific changes will be applied over core branch as patches. –  lig Dec 18 '11 at 8:45
    
Yes, maintainer decides. But needs to know about drawbacks and rebasing published repo is considered a bad practice likely in every upstream project. –  Martian Dec 19 '11 at 12:47
    
I think it is ok for platform specific branches in some cases. But you are right sometimes. It will be better to setup more complicated branches structure to avoid such conflicts. It might be core branch, platform patches (development) branches and additionally platform release branches. It depends on exact team workflow I think. –  lig Dec 19 '11 at 15:15
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