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I am designing an application where a class named Rights is used. This class contains information about what the user can /can't do and also contains other classes like DocumentFilters.

The issue here is that I have a lot of different parts of the application getting an instance of that class through their constructor or get method, in order to be able to verify a user action before allowing it. It seems like this is bad practice (I might be wrong). Are there ways to improve this?

The way it works is having the main class of the application creating the Rights class and then creating different components and passing it to those. The components don't have instance of the main class ether.

Example code. This is repeated over several Modules.

public class ModuleA{
    private Rights rights;

    public ModuleA(Rights rights){

        this.rights=rights;
    }
    private boolean verifyRights(ActionEvent e){

        if(e.getSource("copyButton"){

             if(rights.allowedToCopy){
                   return true;
             }
        return false;
    }
}
share|improve this question
    
You could have a valid question, but I am not sure what your exact issue is. Can you give some sample code to illustrate what your concern is? –  Peter Lawrey Dec 16 '11 at 9:23
    
I have several components(classes) storing an instance of the same class(Rights) in order to access one of its methods and make a check. What I am asking is if this is a bad design practice, and if there is a way to make it better. –  Giannis Dec 16 '11 at 9:34
    
I would suggest design is about saying what (and why) needs to be done with minimal reference to how it is done. What you suggest could be fine for the how, but until you have a clear design (the what and why) its not obvious to me you have a design, good or bad. –  Peter Lawrey Dec 16 '11 at 9:40
    
I posted some example code as you asked. I don't know if its correct but it shows whats happening –  Giannis Dec 16 '11 at 9:43

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

That is a valid design and it is called Inversion of control and more specificly Dependency Injection. You can try to use an IoC container for java if you don't want to inject your dependencies manually.

It is also possible to separate the security code into aspects by using AOP. This is a more advanced option, but doing so you can separate the code that checks the security from the real business code.

If the method you showed is duplicated exactly in your Module classes, you should extract the method into a base class. This base class should then be used for all your Module classes.

public class ModuleBase
{     
   private Rights rights;      

   public ModuleA(Rights rights)
   {          
      this.rights=rights;     
   }     

   public boolean verifyRights(ActionEvent e)
   {          
      /// implementation
   }    
}

public class ModuleA : extends Bicycle 
{
   public ModuleA(Rights rights)
   {          
      super(rights);
   }           
}
share|improve this answer

First of all I would suggest to isolate all the rights checking code into some special layer. Usually, the Facade patten is helpful here - it can check rights and then forward requests to the underlying business logic.

But this is not always possible. In this case you still have to provide classes with references to Rights instance. There are several patterns here:

  • Pass it to constructor/method (like you do) - still works.
  • Introduce Context which will store the Rights instance and make it available for necessary classes. But context is really helpful when it stores many reusable instances, not only one.
  • Use any dependency injection framework.

Hope this helps.

share|improve this answer
    
Rights is an abstract class, with subclasses that define different sets of rights(say copy and paste, only copy, only view etc). So when an event occurs that should change the rights of a user I would go on a loop and set new Rights on each of the modules using setters. That means your second suggestion (Introduce Context) should be used? If yes could you provide some more information about what you mean ? Cheers –  Giannis Dec 16 '11 at 23:00

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