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So I am trying to build a range pinger which job will be to use 2 IP addresses and then compare each to calculate which addresses must be pinged.

The problem is that after whole day of thinking of how to create code which would check for range I came up with nothing, so I came here.

Example, I am having an address range from: 192.168.0.1 to: 192.168.1.1 which means I want to ping 254 IP addresses.

How to make this happend?

What I must check in my IF statements?

As of right now I have this:

public partial class PingIPRange : Form
{
    public PingIPRange()
    {
        InitializeComponent();

        txtFrom.Text = "74.125.225.20";
        txtTo.Text = "74.125.225.30";
    }

    private void btnPing_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {
        //for (int i = 0; i < int.Parse(txtRepeat.Text); i++)
        //{
            CalculateRange(txtFrom.Text, txtTo.Text);
        //}
    }

    private void CalculateRange(string addressFrom, string addressTo)
    {
        int max = 10;
        int min = 0;

        int from1 = 0;
        int from2 = 0;
        int from3 = 0;
        int from4 = 0;

        int to1 = 0;
        int to2 = 0;
        int to3 = 0;
        int to4 = 0;

        var from = txtFrom.Text.Split('.');
        var to = txtTo.Text.Split('.');

        if (from.Length == 4)
        {
            from1 = int.Parse(from[0]);
            from2 = int.Parse(from[1]);
            from3 = int.Parse(from[2]);
            from4 = int.Parse(from[3]);
        }

        if (to.Length == 4)
        {
            to1 = int.Parse(to[0]);
            to2 = int.Parse(to[1]);
            to3 = int.Parse(to[2]);
            to4 = int.Parse(to[3]);
        }

        if (from1 == to1 && from2 == to2 && from3 == to3 && from4 == to4)
        {
            Ping(string.Format("{0}.{1}.{2}.{3}", from1, from2, from3, from4));
        }
        else
        {
        }


    }

    private void Ping(string address)
    {
        Ping pingSender = new Ping();
        PingOptions options = new PingOptions();
        options.DontFragment = true;
        // Create a buffer of 32 bytes of data to be transmitted.  
        string data = "aaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaa";
        byte[] buffer = Encoding.ASCII.GetBytes(data);
        int timeout = 120;
        try
        {
            PingReply reply = pingSender.Send(address, timeout, buffer, options) ;
            if (reply.Status == IPStatus.Success)
            {
                /*PingReply replyy = pingSender.Send(address, timeout, buffer, options);
                if (reply.Status == IPStatus.Success)
                {
                    txtDisplay.Text += "IP: " + replyy.Address.ToString() + ". "
                        + "Round Trip: " + replyy.RoundtripTime + ". "
                        + "TTL: " + replyy.Options.Ttl + ". "
                        + "Don't Fragment: " + replyy.Options.DontFragment + ". "
                        + "Buffer Size: " + replyy.Buffer.Length + ". ";
                }*/

                txtDisplay.Text += "Host " + address + " is open." + Environment.NewLine;
            }
            else
            {
                txtDisplay.Text += "Host " + address + " is closed." + Environment.NewLine;
            }
        }
        catch (Exception ex)
        {
            txtDisplay.SelectedText += Environment.NewLine + ex.Message;
        }
    }
}
share|improve this question
    
You had to come all the way here for this?! – Kris Dec 16 '11 at 11:03
    
@Kris: Yes, my cable is long :D But I do have bit of a problem creating this syntax by trying wrap around my mind with this problem. – NewHelpNeeder Dec 16 '11 at 11:06
    
So at last, you did fine the solution, then. Resolved, I suppose. :) – Kris Dec 16 '11 at 11:09
    
Is the assumption that these are /24's. And a range of 0.1 through 1.1 seems odd. Did you mean 0.1 through 0.254? – dbasnett Dec 16 '11 at 12:12
    
@dbasnett, well I want from 0.1-254 then 1.0-1. – NewHelpNeeder Dec 16 '11 at 20:45
up vote 3 down vote accepted

I'd make two functions which convert an IP address to a number and vice-versa:

static uint str2ip(string ip)
{
    string[] numbers = ip.Split('.');

    uint x1 = (uint)(Convert.ToByte(numbers[0]) << 24);
    uint x2 = (uint)(Convert.ToByte(numbers[1]) << 16);
    uint x3 = (uint)(Convert.ToByte(numbers[2]) << 8);
    uint x4 = (uint)(Convert.ToByte(numbers[3]));

    return x1 + x2 + x3 + x4;
}

and

static string ip2str(uint ip)
{
    string s1 = ((ip & 0xff000000) >> 24).ToString() + "."; 
    string s2 = ((ip & 0x00ff0000) >> 16).ToString() + ".";
    string s3 = ((ip & 0x0000ff00) >> 8).ToString() + "."; 
    string s4 = (ip & 0x000000ff).ToString();

    string ip2 = s1 + s2 + s3 + s4;
    return ip2;
}

This way you can easily iterate through all the IPs. Here's a sample program:

static void Main(string[] args)
{
    uint startIP = str2ip("250.255.255.100");
    uint endIP = str2ip("255.0.1.255");

    for(uint currentIP = startIP; currentIP <= endIP; currentIP++) {
        string thisIP = ip2str(currentIP);
        Console.WriteLine(thisIP);
    }

    Console.ReadKey();
}
share|improve this answer
    
This seems interesting. I will try that tomorrow, though. – NewHelpNeeder Dec 16 '11 at 11:24
1  
This is very nice! Though I'm concerned with the bit ((ip & 0xff000000) >> 24) - if the top bit is 1 and we're using int not uint, doesn't >> fill from the left with 1s? – Rawling Dec 16 '11 at 11:45
    
@Rawling: Yes you are right, thanks. Very clever remark! :) – BlackBear Dec 16 '11 at 12:12
1  
Actually, not that clever. It seems that 0xff000000 is a uint rather than an int, and that the result of int & uint is... a long. So it worked anyway. Go figure :) – Rawling Dec 16 '11 at 12:31

The main problem here is to increment an IP address. As an algorithm rather than C# code, what you want to do is:

  • Increment the fourth int (e.g. from4).
  • If the fourth int is now 256, set it to zero and increment the third int . Otherwise you have your next IP address.
  • If the third int is now 256, set it to zero and increment the second int. Otherwise you have your next IP address. (Notice a pattern?)
  • If the second int is now 256, set it to zero and increment the first int. Otherwise you have your next IP address.
  • If the first int is now 256, set it to zero. At this point stop as you've wrapped around to 0.0.0.0 - unless you want to allow this, if e.g. your to address is before your from address.

You now have your next IP address - so you can check it against your to IP address and see whether to ping it or finish, by breaking out of whatever loop this code is in.

share|improve this answer
    
This seems reasonable. – NewHelpNeeder Dec 16 '11 at 11:00
    
Ah, so basically do this IP incrementation from my from address until I reach my to address. – NewHelpNeeder Dec 16 '11 at 11:11
    
Yup... just be careful with the boundaries to make sure you do or do not ping your from or to addresses, depending on whether you want to or not. – Rawling Dec 16 '11 at 11:13
    
Also, I'm a bit fuzzy as to whether you want to include addresses with bytes of 255, so adjust your checks to taste. Similarly for zero bytes. – Rawling Dec 16 '11 at 11:16

If this were Visual Basic I would do this

Public Class Form1

    Private Sub Button1_Click(sender As System.Object, e As System.EventArgs) Handles Button1.Click
        Dim startIP As New anIP("192.168.0.1")
        Dim endIP As New anIP("192.168.1.1")

        For x As Integer = startIP.asNumber To endIP.asNumber
            Dim foo As New anIP(x)
            Debug.WriteLine(foo.asString)
        Next
    End Sub

    Class anIP
        Property asNumber As Integer
        Property asAddr As Net.IPAddress
        Property asBytes As Byte()
        Property asString As String

        Public Sub New(ipString As String)
            Try
                Me.asAddr = Net.IPAddress.Parse(ipString)
                Me.asBytes = Me.asAddr.GetAddressBytes
                Array.Reverse(Me.asBytes)
                Me.asNumber = BitConverter.ToInt32(Me.asBytes, 0)
            Catch ex As Exception
                Throw
            End Try
        End Sub

        Public Sub New(ipNumber As Integer)
            Me.asBytes = BitConverter.GetBytes(ipNumber)
            Array.Reverse(Me.asBytes)
            Me.asAddr = New Net.IPAddress(Me.asBytes)
            Me.asString = Me.asAddr.ToString
        End Sub
    End Class
End Class

It is hard to tell if the question has subnet boundaries to contend with.

share|improve this answer
    
Only if I knew how to do VB :/ – NewHelpNeeder Dec 17 '11 at 4:16

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