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In a project here, we have an Object ClassTest, which has many sub objects:

public class ClassTest
{
    public bool[] abTestAvailable = new bool[_TESTS];


    public ClassTest_FCT_Extern Test_FCT_Extern = API.Serializer.Load<ClassTest_FCT_Extern>(API.Workstation.strPath_Hardware + "FCT_Extern.xml");
    // ...

The idea was now, that Test_FCT_Extern sets abTestAvailable during initialization:

public class ClassTest_FCT_Extern
{
    public bool TestAvailable
    {
        get { return API.Test.abTestAvailable[(int)ClassTest.IndividualTest.FCT_Extern]; }
        set { API.Test.abTestAvailable[(int)ClassTest.IndividualTest.FCT_Extern] = value; }
    }

But this fails, because during the creation of the API.Test objects, the API.Test.Test_FCT_Extern is created. So, in this moment API.Test still does not exist and the Array abTestAvailable is not yet initialized.

I have found now a solution for our case, but maybe there are smarter ways to access parents parameters.

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1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

In our case, the solution was to make the array static:

public class ClassTest
{
    public static bool[] abTestAvailable = new bool[_TESTS];

The static array is initialized before the Objects are created

public class ClassTest_FCT_Extern
{

    public bool TestAvailable
    {
        get { return ClassTest.abTestAvailable[(int)ClassTest.IndividualTest.FCT_Extern]; }
        set { ClassTest.abTestAvailable[(int)ClassTest.IndividualTest.FCT_Extern] = value; }
    }

works fine, without exception. Moral: make static if possible!

share|improve this answer
    
Yes, works like a charm until you decide to make another instance! Why not just initialize it in the constructor? Or in the setter? Plenty of room everywhere! –  Niko Drašković Dec 16 '11 at 10:43
    
Yes, it's no solution if static is not an option for you. I don't understand your suggestion. The problem is, as far as I understand it, that API.Test doesn't exist, not that the array is uninitialized. –  Nikodemus Dec 16 '11 at 10:50

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