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I want to separate my user interface from my code, so I (obviously) landed at bindings. As a test, I've written the following XAML:

<Window x:Class="BindingTest.MainWindow"
        xmlns="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml/presentation"
        xmlns:x="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml"
        Title="MainWindow" Height="Auto" Width="200">
    <StackPanel>
        <TextBox Text="{Binding Item}"/>
        <Button Content="Add" Click="AddNew"/>
        <ListBox Height="100" ItemsSource="{Binding Items}"/>
    </StackPanel>
</Window>

The C# looks like this:

namespace BindingTest
{
    public partial class MainWindow : Window
    {
        public string Item { get; set; }
        public ObservableCollection<string> Items { get; set; }

        public MainWindow()
        {
            InitializeComponent();
            Items = new ObservableCollection<string>();
        }

        private void AddNew(object sender, RoutedEventArgs e)
        {
            Items.Add(Item);
        }
    }
}

What I want to happen is that the text entered into the textbox is added to the listbox's itemssource. However, this doesn't happen...

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5 Answers 5

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Two things you need two do -

  1. Set - DataContext = this; in your constructor.
  2. You'd be better off if you would change your properties to dependency properties instead. You could do that easily with the "propdp" snippet in visual studio.
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Thanks, setting the DataContext worked... >.> –  ThaMe90 Dec 16 '11 at 10:40
    
There is no need to change the property to dependency property. DP is some what heavier than Normal Property. Instead just implement INotifyProertyChanged that will be fine. –  Kishore Kumar Dec 16 '11 at 10:47
    
Actually, just the first works on it's own... No need to implement that... –  ThaMe90 Dec 16 '11 at 10:52

Data binding is performed against the current data context. However, you have not set the data context for your window. Often you will set the data context to a view model but in your case you simply want to use the window class for that.

You should add the following line to the constructor:

DataContext = this;
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Change your code to this:

    public partial class MainWindow : Window
    {
        public string Item { get; set; } 
        public ObservableCollection<string> Items { get; set; } 
        public MainWindow()
        {
            InitializeComponent(); 
            Items = new ObservableCollection<string>();
            DataContext = this;
        }

        private void AddNew(object sender, RoutedEventArgs e)
        {
            Items.Add(Item);
        }
    }
}

You do need to set your DataContext - works for me.

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Two things:

  1. You should set the correct data context for your window. Otherwise the binding will not find your properties.
  2. You should initialize your Items collection before the InitializeComponent() call as inside it the ListBox tries to evaluate the expression and get NULL as the binding souce. And since you are not implementing INotifyPropertyChanged and the property is not a DependencyProperty the ListBox will never reevaluate the binding thus it will never get the instance of your Items collection.

So, the code should be as follows:

    public MainWindow()
    {
        Items = new ObservableCollection<string>();
        DataContext = this;
        InitializeComponent(); 
    }
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1  
Calling InitializeComponent in the beginning of the constructor works fine. –  Martin Liversage Dec 16 '11 at 10:48
    
How can it work fine? ItemsSource is bound to Items. Inside the InitializeComponent the binding returns NULL since the Items collection is not initialized and the ListBox gets that value. After this point setting Items to some other value (e.g. `new ObsColl<string>) will not update the binding since there are no mechanisms implemented to support that (no INPC, no DP). So - how can it possibly work fine without implementing INPC or DP? –  Jefim Dec 16 '11 at 10:54
    
Try it as I did. –  Martin Liversage Dec 16 '11 at 11:05
    
Well, wasted 10 minutes to try it out. Try #1: InitializeComponent(), set DataContext, set Items => does not work; Try #2 (just to be sure): InitializeComponent(), set Items, set DataContext => does not work; Try #3: Set Items, set DataContext, InitializeComponent() => Works :). I do not know what tools you are using, but it just cannot work. Explain how would it work in your case. –  Jefim Dec 16 '11 at 11:15
    
I'm using the exact same source code as given in the question except I assign this to DataContext in the end of the constructor. If you add PresentationTraceSources.TraceLevel=High to the ItemsSource binding you will see Resolve source deferred being logged when InitializeComponent is being called and then after the constructor has completed Resolving source. So basically data binding will attempt lazy binding if the binding source is null. –  Martin Liversage Dec 16 '11 at 12:19

Try this

hope this will work. But this is not hte right approach. You need to set the DataContext to the Object whose properties u guna use for binding. you must follow MVVM Architecture.

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<TextBox Text="{Binding Item,RelativeSource={RelativeSource AncestorType={x:Type Window}, Mode=FindAncestor}"/> –  user1101511 Dec 16 '11 at 10:51
    
<ListBox Height="100" ItemsSource="{Binding Items,RelativeSource={RelativeSource AncestorType={x:Type Window}, Mode=FindAncestor}"/> –  user1101511 Dec 16 '11 at 10:52

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