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The semicolon (;) at the end of the code is the thing which is got me lost.

private View.OnClickListener onSave = new View.OnClickListener() {

    public void onClick(View v) {

        EditText name=(EditText)findViewById(R.id.name);
        EditText address=(EditText)findViewById(R.id.addr);
        r.setName(name.getText().toString());
        r.setAddress(address.getText().toString());

    }
};
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1  
Why does it lost you? What is valid: private String s = "foo" or private String s = "foo";? –  BalusC Dec 16 '11 at 11:39
    
Sorry for the stupid ques.. It's just that I am a newbee trying to learn Java and android.. The explanation by T.J. Crowder helped.. Thanks for your reply too! –  mickey-monster Dec 16 '11 at 12:31
    
Not a stupid question at all. Anonymous inner classes look really weird when you first meet them. :-) –  T.J. Crowder Dec 16 '11 at 12:34

5 Answers 5

up vote 4 down vote accepted

What you have there is an instantiation of an instance of an anonymous inner class. The semicolon ends the assignment statement that assigns the new instance to onSave. It's basically shorthand for this:

private View.OnClickListener onSave = new MyClickListener();
//                                  the same semicolon ----^

// ...elsewhere, but inside your class...
private class MyClickListener extends View.OnClickListener() {

    public void onClick(View v) {

        EditText name=(EditText)findViewById(R.id.name);
        EditText address=(EditText)findViewById(R.id.addr);
        r.setName(name.getText().toString());
        r.setAddress(address.getText().toString());

    }
}
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Thanks a lot.. this was very helpful –  mickey-monster Dec 16 '11 at 12:39

What we have here is an anonymous inner class. Practically what happens is you are saying "I want to use an object just this time that extends View.OnClickListener". Then you provide the implementation of that object's type directly inline by specifying the onClick method code.

The entire code you posted is simply an assignment, which translates to:

A a = new SubclassOfA();

where SubclassOfA is defined inline directly.

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The semi colon at the end is the end of your onSave declaration.

Same as if you had:

String onSave = "hello"
;

Except the "hello" bit is replaced with a more complex structure!

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it is an instance of an an anonymous class. Hence the semicolon in the end.

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You are defining an instance of OnClickListener. As this is the interface, you have to implement it's onclick method. Also this is the statement, therefore ";" must be used at the end.

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