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I need to iterate through the elements in a numpy array so I can treat any zero elements separately. The code below works for straighforward evaluations, but not when used with scipy.optimize.curve_fit(). Is there a way to make this work with the curve_fit fn?

import numpy as np
from matplotlib.pyplot import *
from scipy.optimize import curve_fit

def my_fn(x_array, b, a):
    y = []
    for x in np.nditer(x_array): #This doesn't work with curve_fit()
        if x == 0:
            y.append(0)
        else:
            y.append(b*(1/np.tanh(x/a) - a/x))
    return np.array(y)


x_meas = [0, 5, 20, 50, 100, 200, 600]
y_meas = [0, 0.275, 1.22, 1.64, 1.77, 1.84, 1.9]
xfit = np.linspace(0,600,601)
yfit2 = my_fn(xfit, 1.95, 8.2) #manual fit

#Not working
#popt, pcov = curve_fit(my_fn, x_meas, y_meas, p0=[1.95, 8.2]) 
#yfit1 = my_fn(xfit, *popt) #auto fit

figure(1)
plot(x_meas, y_meas, 'o', xfit, yfit2)
show()
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1  
Please do always specify what "it doesn't work" means. What's the error message you get when you use this with curve_fit()? Please provide the full traceback. –  Sven Marnach Dec 16 '11 at 12:01

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

To make the larsmans' answer actually work, you will also need to convert your data samples to NumPy arrays:

x_meas = numpy.array([0, 5, 20, 50, 100, 200, 600], float)
y_meas = numpy.array([0, 0.275, 1.22, 1.64, 1.77, 1.84, 1.9], float)

(Converting y_meas is not strictly necessary.)

Here is larsmans' code with my suggestions incorporated:

def my_fn(x, b, a):
    y = np.zeros_like(x)
    nonzero = x != 0
    x = x[nonzero]
    y[nonzero] = b*(1/np.tanh(x/a) - a/x)
    return y
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1  
Thanks for the answer. This works. Actually, by just changing x_meas and y_meas to numpy array types allows my original my_func() to work. This code should be faster though. One point - it's probably better to use y = np.zeros_like(x, float) because the default data type for zeros_like is int64. –  mr_js Dec 16 '11 at 12:57
    
@user602117: The default for zeros_like() isn't int64, but rather the same datatype as the parameter. If the parameter is a Python list, the list will first be converted to a NumPy array using the usual rules. If this list happens to contain only int values, an integer data type is used. That's why I added dtype parameters in the definitions of x_meas and y_meas. –  Sven Marnach Dec 16 '11 at 15:11

I need to iterate through the elements in a numpy array so I can treat any zero elements separately.

No you don't; this should be a lot faster and work everywhere:

def my_fn(x, b, a):
    y = np.zeros(x.shape)
    nonzero = np.where(x != 0)
    x = x[nonzero]
    y[nonzero] = b*(1/np.tanh(x/a) - a/x)
    return y
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1  
The code will be faster if you drop the call to np.where() and simply use nonzero = x != 0. Moreover, y = np.zeros_like(x) would always give y the correct data type, even if x consists of, say, complex numbers. –  Sven Marnach Dec 16 '11 at 12:08

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