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I am reading some equipment configuration output and check if the configuration is correct, according to the HW configuration. The template configurations are stored as files with all the params, and the lines contain regular expressions (basically just to account for variable number of spaces between "object", "param" and "value" in the output, also some index variance)

First of all, I cannot use grep -f $template $output, since I have to process each line of the template separately. I have something like this running

while read line
  do
  attempt=`grep -E "$line" $file`
  # ...etc
  done < $template

Which works just fine if the template doesn't contain regex. Problem: grep interpretes the search option literally when these are read form file. I tested the regex themselves, they work fine from the command line.

With this background, the question is:

How to read regex from a file (line by line) and have grep not interprete them literally?

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Works for me. Please provide a sample expression with which you have a problem and a sample line of text that it should match. –  Sorpigal Dec 16 '11 at 12:36
    
Sorpigal, this is one example: RbsLocalCell=S.C1.+eulMaxOwnUuLoad.+100 should match RbsLocalCell=S1C1 eulMaxOwnUuLoad 100, including varying number of spaces between the fields and different indices. I am sure this works in a command line, but once the regex:s are in a file and read from there one line at a time, the fun stops –  Vadim Schultz Dec 16 '11 at 12:42

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Using the following script:

#!/usr/bin/env bash
# multi-grep
regexes="$1"
file="$2"
while IFS= read -r rx ; do
    result="$(grep -E "$rx" "$file")"
    grep -q -E "$rx" "$file" && printf 'Look ma, a match: %s!\n' "$result"
done < "$regexes"

And files with the following contents:

$ cat regexes
RbsLocalCell=S.C1.+eulMaxOwnUuLoad.+100

$ cat data
RbsLocalCell=S1C1 eulMaxOwnUuLoad 100

I get this result:

$ ./multi-grep regexes data
Look ma, a match: RbsLocalCell=S1C1 eulMaxOwnUuLoad 100!

This works for different spacing as well

$ cat data
RbsLocalCell=S1C1    eulMaxOwnUuLoad           100

$ ./multi-grep regexes data
Look ma, a match: RbsLocalCell=S1C1    eulMaxOwnUuLoad           100!

Seems okay to me.

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Yes, now the magic happens, thank you very much! The read -rbit really saves the day. –  Vadim Schultz Dec 16 '11 at 13:02
    
@VadimSchultz: FYI, while IFS= read -r foo is almost always what you want when doing a while read loop. It's one of those "do what I expect" stanzas that insulates you from the oddity of shell. –  Sorpigal Dec 16 '11 at 16:59
    
I'll stick to that now! After researching the options of read I also started to use -d, which was a great help. –  Vadim Schultz Dec 16 '11 at 21:25

Use the -F option, or fgrep.

What's more, you seem to want to match full lines: add the -x option as well.

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Fge, this doesn't seem to do the trick. If anything, I would understand that -F forces grep into literal interpretation, not vice versa? I would actually want the regex, fetched from file, to work { -F, --fixed-strings Interpret PATTERN as a list of fixed strings, separated by newlines, any of which is to be matched.} –  Vadim Schultz Dec 16 '11 at 12:26
    
You are right about -F. There is something I don't understand then: I thought that you grepped for regexes in a file? Can you add example data? –  fge Dec 16 '11 at 12:32
    
alright, e.g. RbsLocalCell=S.C1.+eulMaxOwnUuLoad.+100 should match RbsLocalCell=S1C1 eulMaxOwnUuLoad 100 and of course all the different indices where the dot is, and different number of spaces between the fields. –  Vadim Schultz Dec 16 '11 at 12:36

Another point: make sure the pattern is not interpreted in some wrong way by the shell by putting "$line" in quotes.

All in all that looks like you better write a perl than a shell script.

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Ingo, sorry this was just for illustrative purposes, the variable is quoted in the actual script. I will of course explore other ways to solve this (perl or python), but I just want to make sure there is no solution within the given conditions –  Vadim Schultz Dec 16 '11 at 12:30

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