Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I was bored and playing around with the ipython console and came upon the following behaviour I don't really understand

In [1]: 2**2
Out[1]: 4

In [2]: 2**2**2
Out[2]: 16

In [3]: 2**2**2**2
Out[3]: 65536

In [4]: 2**2**2**2**2

The answer to [4] is not 4294967296L, it's a very long number, but I can't really figure out why.

The number can be found here: http://pastie.org/475714

(Ubuntu 8.10, python 2.5.2, ipython 0.8.4)
(Mac OS X 10.5.6, Python 2.5.1)

share|improve this question
    
And what is that number that is not 4294967296L? –  Joce May 12 '09 at 15:39
    
provided link for number –  fforw May 12 '09 at 15:44

5 Answers 5

up vote 16 down vote accepted

Python is going right to left on the mathematical power operation. For example, IN[2] is doing:

2**(4) = 16

IN[3] = 2**2**2**2 = 2**2**(4) = 2**16 = 65536

You would need parenthesis if you want it to calculate from left to right. The reason OUT[4] is not outputting the answer you want is because the number is astronomical and Python cannot print it out.

2^65536 = extremely huge

share|improve this answer

The precedence of the ** operator makes the evaluation goes from right-to-left (instead of the expected left-to-right). In other words:

2**2**2**2 == (2**(2**(2**2)))
share|improve this answer

This is because the order of precedence in Python causes this equation to be evaluated from right-to-left.

>>> 2**2
4
>>> 2**2**2
16
>>> 2**(2**2)
16
>>> 2**2**2**2
65536
>>> 2**2**(2**2)
65536
>>> 2**(2**(2**2))
65536
>>> 2**2**2**2**2
57896044618658097711785492504343953926634992332820282019728792003956564819968L
>>> 2**2**2**(2**2)
57896044618658097711785492504343953926634992332820282019728792003956564819968L
>>> 2**2**(2**(2**2))
57896044618658097711785492504343953926634992332820282019728792003956564819968L
>>> 2**(2**(2**(2**2)))
57896044618658097711785492504343953926634992332820282019728792003956564819968L
>>> 2**255
57896044618658097711785492504343953926634992332820282019728792003956564819968L
share|improve this answer

As the other answers already said, it's because ** is evaluated from right to left. Here is the documentation link, where all the precedences are described.

share|improve this answer
    
Imagine for a moment if it was evaluated in the other direction - surely we'd expect the exact same answer since the original statement is symmetrical. –  Salim Fadhley May 13 '09 at 23:44
1  
I am not sure I understand your point. The ** operator is not symmetric (2**3 != 3**2). Precedence can be emulated by placing parentheses. So if you put in parentheses in different ways then the results will in general be different. –  nikow May 14 '09 at 8:57

Evaluating right-to-left, let's look at the steps Python is going through to get these answers:

2**2
4

2**(2**2)
2**(4)
16

2**(2**(2**2))
2**(2**(4))
2**(16)
65536

2**(2**(2**(2**2)))
2**(2**(2**(4)))
2**(2**(16))
2**(65536)
2.0035299304068464649790723515603e+19728
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.