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I am currently using a LINQ query to read an XML file e.g.

<MyObjects>
   <MyObject>
       <MyElement>some_text</MyElement>
       <MyOtherElement>some_more_text</MyOtherElement>
   </MyObject>
</MyObjects>

into a list of custom objects containing custom HistoryString properties. HistoryString contains 2 strings, a currentValue and a previousValue.

This all works great except when using XmlSerializer to write the custom objects back to an XML file, the output fairly obviously contains additional tags i.e.

<MyObjects>
   <MyObject>
       <MyElement>
                  <currentValue>some_text</currentValue>
                  <previousValue>some_text</previousValue>
       </MyElement>
       <MyOtherElement>
                  <currentValue>some_more_text</currentValue>
                  <previousValue>some_more_text</previousValue>
       </MyOtherElement>
   </MyObject>
</MyObjects>

Q: What would be the neatest and/or most efficient way of reading and writing XML in the same format, based on this fundamental difference?

Some initial ideas:

1) Mark the previousValue property with [System.Xml.Serialization.XmlIgnore] then sweep through the XML string that is to be written removing all traces of <currentValue> and </currentValue>

2) Open the existing file and manually make any updates/deletes/additions - this is surely more long winded.

3) Any way of having a HistoryString automatically resolve to its currentValue rather than serialize each of its properties, similar to how ToString() works?

I have done some research into this, including the useful MSDN articles here and here but I can't see any other attributes that would solve this problem, I am still unsure whether this is possible. Any ideas?

share|improve this question
up vote 1 down vote accepted

Here is another idea. If you define your class like so:

[Serializable]
public class MyObject
{
    [XmlElement(ElementName = "MyElement")]
    public string CurrentValueElement
    {
        get
        {
            return Element.CurrentValue;
        }

        set
        {
            Element = new MyElement
                          {
                              CurrentValue = value, PreviousValue = value
                          };
        }
    }

    [XmlElement(ElementName = "MyOtherElement")]
    public string CurrentValueOtherElement
    {
        get
        {
            return OtherElement.CurrentValue;
        }
        set {}
    }

    [XmlIgnore]
    public MyElement Element { get; set; }

    [XmlIgnore]
    public MyElement OtherElement { get; set; }

}

Then, when the object is serialized, the output XML will look exactly like your example.

Also, if you extend the CurrentValueElement/CurrentValueOtherElement setter like this:

[XmlElement(ElementName = "MyElement")]
public string CurrentValueElement
{
    get
    {
        return Element.CurrentValue;
    }

    set
    {
        Element = new MyElement
                      {
                          CurrentValue = value, PreviousValue = value
                      };
    }
}

Then you'll be able to use the XmlSerializer to deserialize your objects directly without needing to resorting to LINQ.

share|improve this answer
    
works like a treat, thanks :) – Adam Marshall Dec 19 '11 at 9:51

Well why not serialize back using original schema and feeding into it the list of transformed objects from history using only current value?

e.g.

from h in HistoryEntryList
select new OriginalEntry{ field = h.field.current_value, ... };
share|improve this answer
    
Sounds good to me, I'm fairly new to LINQ so let me see if I can rustle something up. Currently I am doing XElement.Load(path) then building a query on the way in, but then on the way back just using XmlSerializer to serialize them to a StreamWriter. – Adam Marshall Dec 16 '11 at 12:35
    
If you have the schema of the original xml (which I suspect you do since you query against it using linq) you can use XmlSerializer to tranform the list back into xml, its just a matter of converting your hsitory list into a list of "original" objects, which above linq does for you. – mmix Dec 16 '11 at 12:39

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