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I keep writing specific exception throwers in the case the Optional is absent.

For instance:

Optional<?> optional = ...;
if (!optional.isPresent()) {
  throw new MyException();
}
Object result = optional.get();

I find this code not very fluent, especially the use of the bang (!). I'd rather like writing something like:

Optional<?> optional = ...;
Object result = optional.orThrow(MyException.class);

Is there such a shortcut in Guava that I haven't found yet?

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6  
General question. If the thing you are checking is Optional, isn't it against the concept of "optional" to have a method like "Optional.orThrow"? –  black panda Dec 16 '11 at 13:23
4  
Totally agree. If isAbsent (added in release 11) is a valid condition, it should not result in an exception. The point of Optional is that absent is a valid not exceptional case. If absent is an exceptional case, your method should just return the object and throw and exception in the absent case. –  John B Dec 16 '11 at 13:57
1  
@black panda: then why can I give a default value with the or() method? It's a kind of allowing a default behavior to happen, why not another? @ John B: One of the use case is a rather generic XML attribute extractor: that attribute may or may not be present, so the method returns an Optional. Then the caller may want to enforce the presence of the value (by throwing an exception), or get the value if any, or even retrieve a default value. The extractor method just doesn't know what the caller wants to do with the value, so it must return a Optional. Why would this use case be invalid? –  Olivier Grégoire Dec 16 '11 at 17:28
2  
Plus, you are answering with the only thing I strongly disagree with Guava: the "use exactly as we intend in our limited set of use-cases or just leave" approach. This approach is the only downside I see in Guava - a big one, but still, the only one. I love all the rest. I would have hoped not to find the same "no"-wall over here. By the way, release 11 doesn't include isAbsent() (see issue 734 of Guava) –  Olivier Grégoire Dec 16 '11 at 17:53
3  
@ogregoire: it is common and expected behavior that if something is optional then a default value is acceptable. That's a natural extension of something being optional. "You don't specify it? Oh well, it's optional anyway, I'll use the default value." Not "This is optional. You didn't provide it? Then I'll throw an exception because it's mandatory that it be there." –  black panda Dec 16 '11 at 18:10

4 Answers 4

up vote 14 down vote accepted

Speaking as a Guava developer, let me try to unpack the logic here. Responding both to the original question, and the comment thread directly on the question:

It is absolutely the case that we try to force Guava users to respect our standards of good programming habits. (Our standards are strongly influenced by e.g. Effective Java.)

That said, I agree that there are perfectly good use cases for the behavior you're referring to in this particular question: "if absent, throw an exception." Perhaps you're implementing a class that can be accessed both ways -- one method with an Optional return value, and one method that assumes that the value will always be present, throwing an exception otherwise. The Deque interface, for instance, provides special-valued and exception-throwing versions of peek, poll, and offer.

All that said, to the best of my understanding, the True Guava Way to do this is...

if (value.isPresent()) {
  return value.get();
} else {
  throw new MyException();
}

The "orThrow" method you propose requires reflection (!!), doesn't let you customize the exception with a useful message, etc. The "normal way" is perfectly readable and more efficient.

Sometimes Guava doesn't provide explicit support for things because for those use cases, we think it's best done just the "normal way." I think this is the case here.

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Well, an orThrow() method doesn't specially require reflection: one can think about delegating the instanciation of the Exception to a Supplier or a Function. Anyways, the main point is that the "True Guava Way to do this" is repeated roughly 50 times with roughly 10 different exceptions, and only with new code produced since Guava 10! We don't want to duplicate that kind of code again and again. We've created several a helper methods (1 per Exception constructor + extras) and that's enough for us. I just wanted to know if an alternative existed, which doesn't. I won't open a ticket. –  Olivier Grégoire Dec 17 '11 at 21:05
    
A Supplier or Function would require the use of icky anonymous classes, and still more code than is required in the straightforward approach. If you have that much repetition it might be appropriate, although I'd think that the most effective helper methods would be one helper for each exception type, which seems to be what you've done. –  Louis Wasserman Dec 18 '11 at 12:08

Here's another way to do it without additions to Guava:

Object result = optional.or(new Supplier() {
    public Object get() {
        throw new MyException();
    }
});

MyException has to be unchecked, but this does allow you to pass arguments to its constructor. And of course if you're doing it a lot you can store the Supplier somewhere and use it each place you need it.

Object result = optional.or(SomethingIsMissing.INSTANCE);
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I don't think this would belong to the library. I find it very rare to find a library that receives an instance of an exception to be throw in case something doesn't go as expected, especially because in many cases an exception must have a message indicating what went wrong.

That being said, you can create your own Optional class that does what you need. Or you can create your own OptionalHelper class where you have a method that does what you want:

public class OptionalHelper {
   public <T> T valueOrThrow(final Optional<T> optional) throws MyException {
      if (optional.isPresent()) {
          return optional.get();
      } else {
          throw new MyException();
      }
   }
}

EDIT:

Supposing you have a custom class that receives a parameter/ field name that you need to check, you could have a better approach similar to what Preconditions does:

public class OptionalHelper {
   public <T> T valueOrFail(final Optional<T> optional, final String fieldName) throws OptionalNotPresentError {
      if (optional.isPresent()) {
          return optional.get();
      } else {
          throw new OptionalNotPresentError(fieldName);
      }
   }
}
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If you pass your own exception class, you will have to instantiate it with Class.newInstance() before throwing it. –  Ravi Wallau Dec 16 '11 at 13:25
    
How would you declare this .newInstance'd exception in the throws clause? You'd have to have an general Exception subclass that you know about that contains the Exception you want to throw, right? It feels messy to me. –  black panda Dec 16 '11 at 13:36
    
It is a messy approach for sure. This is why they don't have it in the library and this is why I didn't include it in my example (only added it as a comment). Answering your question, you could get away with declaring it if you extend your exception class from RuntimeException (and not from Exception). –  Ravi Wallau Dec 16 '11 at 13:45
    
It would be better to have a pre-defined exception class and pass a message/ enum value/ something else correlated with the situation being checked, and then throw that exception if the wanted object is absent from the Optional class. –  Ravi Wallau Dec 16 '11 at 13:47
1  
@ogregoire I don't think it has and I don't think such method belongs in the API. –  Ravi Wallau Dec 16 '11 at 18:40

This works for me (no reflection, just type inference):

public class ExceptionSupplier<T, E extends RuntimeException> implements Supplier<T> {

    private final E exception;

    private ExceptionSupplier(E exception) {
        this.exception = exception;
    }

    public static <T, E extends RuntimeException> ExceptionSupplier<T, E> throwA(E exception) {
        return new ExceptionSupplier<T, E>(exception);
    }    

    public static <T, E extends RuntimeException> ExceptionSupplier<T, E> throwA(@SuppressWarnings("UnusedParameters") Class<T> class_, E exception) {
        return new ExceptionSupplier<T, E>(exception);
    }

    @Override
    public T get() {
        throw exception;
    }
}

Usage:

Something something = optionalSomething.or(throwA(Something.class, new SomeException()));

This probably can be extended even further, but for my use cases it's sufficient and easy to understand.

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