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The title has it. :)

Example:

from numpy import random
from matplotlib import pyplot as plt

data = [1 + random.randn(1000), random.randn(1000)]
bins = 10

plt.hist(data, bins, label=['first', 'second'])
plt.hist(data[1], bins, histtype='step', label=['second again'])

plt.legend()

plt.show()

gives ('step' type chosen to aid "viewability", its the same with defaults):

the damn thing ;)

See?

Thanks for help in advance!

share|improve this question
    
C'mon guys, this must be (such) a simple question! ;) – mlvljr Dec 16 '11 at 13:12
up vote 3 down vote accepted

Here is the process that hist currently uses (in the matplotlib git repo) for determining the bins:

  1. If bins is given as the actual bins, those bins will be used
  2. If bin_range is given, then those two values will be used for the bin_range.
  3. If bin_range is not given, then use [min of all data, max of all data] as the bin_range.
  4. Use numpy's histogram function on each set of data with the parameters bin_range and bins. However bins is replaced with what comes out of histogram. That means that the bins are ultimately determined in your first example of two sets of input data by calling numpy's histogram with bins = 10 and bin_range = [min of all data, max of all data] on the first set of data.

As you can imagine, it isn't surprising that you will get a different set of bins for using hist with one data set, the other data set, and both together with these criteria because the bin_range will likely be different in all three instances.

share|improve this answer
    
Yikes! You're in time! – mlvljr Dec 16 '11 at 15:41

Ok, no one said the bins will be the same for different x-axis value intervals ;)

Here it is (see the accepted answer):

from numpy import random
from matplotlib import pyplot as plt


data = [1 + random.randn(1000), random.randn(1000)]
num_bins = 10

_n, bins, _patches = plt.hist(data, num_bins, label=['first', 'second'])
plt.hist(data[1], bins, histtype='step', label=['second again'])

plt.legend()

plt.show()

giving:

enter image description here

share|improve this answer
    
Anyone to upvote me now? :) – mlvljr Dec 16 '11 at 15:57
2  
Not to be rude, but this answer doesn't answer your question. You asked how it was that you got different bins. I answered that - which is really more of a why question. This answers a different question - how to get the same bins. That's a much easier to question to answer. So why are you begging for upvotes? – Justin Peel Dec 17 '11 at 5:39
    
@Justin Begging? Nope, that was a command! (Yep I'm that filthy ;) ) Don't be too serious ;)) – mlvljr Dec 17 '11 at 21:36

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