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This is what I have:

use 5.14.0;
use strict;
use warnings;

sub my_func(&$) {
    my $coderef = shift;
    my %attribs = @_;
}

This is what I'd like to achieve:

my_func {
    print 1;
} first_attrib => "1",second_attrib => "2";

However, I receive the error Too many arguments for main::my_func at x.pl line 12, near ""2";". How should I modify the prototype, so that the parameters after the coderef will be transformed into a hash?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 8 down vote accepted

If you change sub my_func(&$) to sub my_func(&%) your code will work.

The problem is that first_attrib => "1",second_attrib => "2" isn't a hash ref, but a list. And as friedo pointed out a list can be assigned to a hash, though a list with an odd number of elements might produce unwanted results and will produce a warning with use warnings.

Alternatively you can change your code to

sub my_func(&$) {
    my $coderef = shift;
    my ($attribs) = @_;
}

my_func {
    print 1;
} {first_attrib => "1",second_attrib => "2"};

to achieve what you seem to want.

The reason why you must wrap $attribs in parens is that assigning an array to a scalar returns just the number of elements in the array. At this point @_ is this array:

({first_attrib => "1",second_attrib => "2"})

with a hash ref as a single element.

($attribs) = @_;

tells perl to create an anonymous array with the scalar $attribs as its first element, and assign elements from @_ to the anonymous array, element by element, thus making $attribs point at the hash ref in @_.

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2  
It's more accurate to say that first_attrib => "1",second_attrib => "2" is a list, and a list can be assigned to a hash. –  friedo Dec 16 '11 at 15:54
    
@friedo: That is true. Thanks for pointing that out. –  flesk Dec 16 '11 at 16:08

You need to realize the arguments to a Perl sub form a list. You use the first element of the argument list for the coderef and the remaining elements to form a hash:

#!/usr/bin/env perl

use 5.14.0;
use strict;
use warnings;

sub my_func(&@) {
    my $coderef = shift;
    my %attribs = @_;
    $coderef->() for keys %attribs;
}

my_func {
    print 1;
} first_attrib => "1",second_attrib => "2";
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2  
++, the code will work with the call as written, if the prototype is just changed to (&@). –  hobbs Dec 16 '11 at 15:35
3  
@hobbs: Or (&%), which in my opinion would be more intuitive given what the OP wants to achieve. –  flesk Dec 16 '11 at 15:49

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