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I was trying to discover some of the goodies of the new C++11 standard (using g++ 4.6.2). Playing around with lambdas in a an "all_of" algorithm function, I encountered a strange problem with the std:: qualifier.

I am "using" the std namespace as shown at the beginning of the code snippet. This makes the declaration of the pair variable in the for loop well-defined.

However, I tried the same in the lambda argument used in the "all_of" algorithm. I came across several hard-to-understand error messages, before I realized that a full std:: qualified std::pair would work there, but only pair not.

Am I missing an important point? The declaration of the lambda happens in this file, so the namespace should still be active here, right? Or does the required std:: qualifier depend on some STL code in a different file? Or is it likely to be a bug in g++?

Best regards, Peter

PS: the code compiles without warnings as pasted here, but removing the std:: in the all_of lambda, I get an error message.

#include <iostream>
#include <memory>
#include <map>
#include <string>
#include <algorithm>
#include <utility>

using namespace std;

void duckburg() {

const int threshold = 100;
map <string, int> money;

money["donald"] = 200;
money["daisy"] = 400;
money["scrooge"] = 2000000;

// obviously, an "auto" type would work here nicely,
// but this way my problem is illustrated more clearly:

for (const pair <string, int> &pair : money) {
    cout << pair.first << "\t" << pair.second << endl;
}

if (all_of(money.begin(), money.end(),
    [&](std::pair<string, int> p) {
    return bool(p.second > threshold);
})) 
{
    cout << "yes, everyone is rich!";
} else {
    cout << "no, some are poor!";
};
}

Edit: Just noticed I received a downvote for this old question. No problem with that, but please elaborate on the reasons. It will help me improve future questions, and in the end the entire community will profit. Thanks!

share|improve this question
3  
Sounds like a bug in GCC, compiles fine with MSVC 10. Can't test with Clang, as they do not implement lambdas yet. FWIW, GCC 4.5.1 has no problems with this minimized code. –  Xeo Dec 16 '11 at 13:19
    
yes, I would have tested with/without the mentioned std:: in Clang myself, but for now it's impossible because of the missing lambdas. –  Piotr99 Dec 16 '11 at 13:22
1  
You should make a version with all the unnecessary code removed, and provide the error message. –  Mankarse Dec 16 '11 at 13:23
4  
Try renaming the variable pair in your for loop. It's scope should only extend to the end of the for loop and therefore not interfere with your lambda, but g++ has or used to have compatibility code for ancient for-scoping rules where that was not the case. If there is a bug in gcc, it might be related to that. –  wolfgang Dec 16 '11 at 13:25
1  
@Piotr99 On a side note, "using namespace std" seems to be going out of fashion among advocates of good style, anyway. –  wolfgang Dec 16 '11 at 13:31

1 Answer 1

up vote 8 down vote accepted

Rename the variable pair in your for loop.

It's scope should only extend to the end of the for loop and therefore not interfere with your lambda, but g++ has some code for ancient for-scoping rules where that was not the case, so it can emit better error messages for ancient C++ code.

It looks as if there is a bug in that compatibility code.

share|improve this answer
    
Yes, thanks! It's true -- with a different variable name in the for loop it works! Still, I agree with you, it should be restricted to the loop's scope... –  Piotr99 Dec 16 '11 at 13:29
    
For the record, there is already a gcc bug report: gcc.gnu.org/bugzilla/show_bug.cgi?id=10852 - the lambda just makes the error message worse. –  wolfgang Dec 16 '11 at 13:58
    
wow, good to know! –  Piotr99 Dec 17 '11 at 17:14

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