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I think I've come across this requirement for a dozen times. But I could never find a satisfying solution. For instance, there are a collection of string which I want to serialize (to disk or through network) through a channel where only plain string is allowed. I almost always end up using "split" and "join" with ridiculous separator like

":::==--==:::".

like this:

public static string encode(System.Collections.Generic.List<string> data)
{
    return string.Join(" :::==--==::: ", data.ToArray());
}
public static string[] decode(string encoded)
{
    return encoded.Split(new string[] { " :::==--==::: " }, StringSplitOptions.None);
}

But this simple solution apparently has some flaws. The string cannot contains the separator string. And consequently, the encoded string can no longer re-encoded again.

AFAIK, the comprehensive solution should involve escaping the separator on encoding and unescaping on decoding. While the problem sound simple, I believe the complete solution can take significant amount of code. I wonder if there is any trick allowed me to build encoder & decoder in very few lines of code ?

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12 Answers 12

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You shouldn't need to do this manually. As the other answers have pointed out, there are plenty of ways, built-in or otherwise, to serialize/deserialize.

However, if you did decide to do the work yourself, it doesn't require that much code:

public static string CreateDelimitedString(IEnumerable<string> items)
{
    StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder();

    foreach (string item in items)
    {
        sb.Append(item.Replace("\\", "\\\\").Replace(",", "\\,"));
        sb.Append(",");
    }

    return (sb.Length > 0) ? sb.ToString(0, sb.Length - 1) : string.Empty;
}

This will delimit the items with a comma (,). Any existing commas will be escaped with a backslash (\) and any existing backslashes will also be escaped.

public static IEnumerable<string> GetItemsFromDelimitedString(string s)
{
    bool escaped = false;
    StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder();

    foreach (char c in s)
    {
        if ((c == '\\') && !escaped)
        {
            escaped = true;
        }
        else if ((c == ',') && !escaped)
        {
            yield return sb.ToString();
            sb.Length = 0;
        }
        else
        {
            sb.Append(c);
            escaped = false;
        }
    }

    yield return sb.ToString();
}
share|improve this answer
    
Wow ! It's amazing that you can code this instantly. –  Sake May 12 '09 at 16:17
    
@Sake, I didn't knock it up instantly, although it didn't take too long. (I actually wrote it a few days ago as a response to a different SO question.) –  LukeH May 12 '09 at 16:23
    
@Luke, But you'd prefer Earwicker solution ? Why ? –  Sake May 12 '09 at 16:37
    
@Sake, As I said at the top of my answer, you shouldn't need to serialize/deserialize manually these days. URL encoding is tried-and-tested and (mostly) human-readable. And in most modern languages/frameworks it only takes a line or two of code. –  LukeH May 12 '09 at 16:46
    
I think it's possible to do this much simpler. Just replace one character (like | with |s). Then use || as separator. When splitting, just split on any || found. After that unescape the split strings by replacing |s with |. –  john16384 Jul 15 '12 at 10:24

You could use the .ToArray property on the List<> and then serialize the Array - that could then be dumped to disk or network, and reconstituted with a deserialization on the other end.

Not too much code, and you get to use the serialization techniques already tested and coded in the .net framework.

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Unfortunately, the channel can only allowed "string". And I always want the output to be "readable". –  Sake May 12 '09 at 15:54
2  
.Net serialization will go to strings. –  Joel Coehoorn May 12 '09 at 15:57
    
base64 encode to be readable and fit your requirement. –  Matt Dec 17 '10 at 10:31

You might like to look at the way CSV files are formatted.

  • escape all instances of a deliminater, e.g. " in the string
  • wrap each item in the list in "item"
  • join using a simple seperator like ,

I don't believe there is a silver bullet solution to this problem.

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Add a reference and using to System.Web, and then:

public static string Encode(IEnumerable<string> strings)
{
    return string.Join("&", strings.Select(s => HttpUtility.UrlEncode(s)).ToArray());
}

public static IEnumerable<string> Decode(string list)
{
    return list.Split('&').Select(s => HttpUtility.UrlDecode(s));
}

Most languages have a pair of utility functions that do Url "percent" encoding, and this is ideal for reuse in this kind of situation.

share|improve this answer
    
LOL at the downvoter! –  Daniel Earwicker May 12 '09 at 16:23
    
+1, This would be my preferred option. –  LukeH May 12 '09 at 16:27
    
Mmmm, I could forgive someone for reinventing the wheel maybe, but reinventing string escaping is beyond the pale! –  Daniel Earwicker May 12 '09 at 16:32
    
FWIW, I'm not the downvoter. –  Sake May 12 '09 at 16:36
    
So the question is, why aren't you an upvoter? :) –  Daniel Earwicker May 12 '09 at 16:41

Here's an old-school technique that might be suitable -

Serialise by storing the width of each string[] as a fixed-width prefix in each line.

So

 string[0]="abc"
 string[1]="defg"
 string[2]=" :::==--==::: "

becomes

0003abc0004defg0014 :::==--==:::

...where the size of the prefix is large enough to cater for the string maximum length

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Why I couldn't come out with this solution before ! Nice solution ! –  Sake May 12 '09 at 15:58
1  
I like this one, you could modify it slightly to be the size plus a separator so you can handle any size prefix, for example: 3|abc4|defg6|--==-- –  Jacob Stanley May 12 '09 at 16:04
    
You could add another separator after the string as well even though it's not required for parsing, just to make it easier to read. Something like 3abc4defg6`--==-- or 3:abc:4:defg:6:--==-- . That last one is starting to look like the php serialize() function :) a:1:{s:5:"Hello";s:5:"World";} –  Jacob Stanley May 12 '09 at 16:10

You could use an XmlDocument to handle the serialization. That will handle the encoding for you.

public static string encode(System.Collections.Generic.List<string> data)
{
    var xml = new XmlDocument();
    xml.AppendChild(xml.CreateElement("data"));
    foreach (var item in data)
    {
    	var xmlItem = (XmlElement)xml.DocumentElement.AppendChild(xml.CreateElement("item"));
    	xmlItem.InnerText = item;
    }
    return xml.OuterXml;
}

public static string[] decode(string encoded)
{
    var items = new System.Collections.Generic.List<string>();
    var xml = new XmlDocument();
    xml.LoadXml(encoded);
    foreach (XmlElement xmlItem in xml.SelectNodes("/data/item"))
    	items.Add(xmlItem.InnerText);
    return items.ToArray();
}
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I sometimes do exactly what you suggest. But it's overkill in most situations. –  Sake May 12 '09 at 15:59

I would just prefix every string with its length and an terminator indicating the end of the length.

abc
defg
hijk
xyz
546
4.X

becomes

3: abc 4: defg 4: hijk 3: xyz 3: 546 3: 4.X

No restriction or limitations at all and quite simple.

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Json.NET is a very easy way to serialize about any object you can imagine. JSON keeps things compact and can be faster than XML.

List<string> foo = new List<string>() { "1", "2" };
string output = JsonConvert.SerializeObject(foo);
List<string> fooToo = (List<string>)JsonConvert.DeserializeObject(output, typeof(List<string>));
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It can be done much simpler if you are willing to use a separator of 2 characters long:

In java code:

StringBuilder builder = new StringBuilder();

for(String s : list) {
  if(!s.isEmpty()) {
    builder.append("||");
  }
  builder.append(s.replace("|", "|p"));
}

And back:

for(String item : encodedList.split("||")) {
  list.add(item.replace("|p", "|"));
}
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Why not use Xstream to serialise it, rather than reinventing your own serialisation format?

Its pretty simple:

new XStream().toXML(yourobject)
share|improve this answer
    
sorry c# question, java answer... –  time4tea May 12 '09 at 15:53
    
That's fine. The question is language agnostic. I'd personally prefer python answer. My sample is in C# to attract more audiences. –  Sake May 12 '09 at 15:56

Include the System.Linq library in your file and change your functions to this:

    public static string encode(System.Collections.Generic.List<string> data, out string delimiter)
    {
        delimiter = ":";
        while(data.Contains(delimiter)) delimiter += ":";
        return string.Join(delimiter, data.ToArray());
    }
    public static string[] decode(string encoded, string delimiter)
    {
        return encoded.Split(new string[] { delimiter }, StringSplitOptions.None);
    }
share|improve this answer
    
So the delimiter will have to be embedded along with the message ? –  Sake May 12 '09 at 16:02
    
Yes, u include it with the message so it can be decoded. It solves both your problems you mentioned. –  Anonymous May 12 '09 at 16:04
    
What if the end of one of the strings contains the delimiter, for example: "abc:def" or even just "abc:"? –  Jacob Stanley May 12 '09 at 16:21
    
The while statement checks if the string contains the delimiter and modifies it until it is not found in the string. –  Anonymous May 12 '09 at 17:55

There are loads of textual markup languages out there, any would function

Many would function trivially given the simplicity of your input it all depends on how:

  1. human readable you want the encoding
  2. resilient to api changes it should be
  3. how easy to parse it is
  4. how easy it is to write or get a parser for it.

If the last one is the most important then just use the existing xml libraries MS supply for you:

class TrivialStringEncoder
{
    private readonly XmlSerializer ser = new XmlSerializer(typeof(string[]));

    public string Encode(IEnumerable<string> input)
    {
        using (var s = new StringWriter())
        {
            ser.Serialize(s, input.ToArray());
            return s.ToString();
        }   	
    }

    public IEnumerable<string> Decode(string input)
    {
        using (var s = new StringReader(input))
        {
            return (string[])ser.Deserialize(s);    		
        }   	
    }

    public static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        var encoded = Encode(args);
        Console.WriteLine(encoded);
        var decoded = Decode(encoded);
        foreach(var x in decoded)
            Console.WriteLine(x);
    }
}

running on the inputs "A", "<", ">" you get (edited for formatting):

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-16"?>
<ArrayOfString 
    xmlns:xsi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema-instance" 
    xmlns:xsd="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema">
  <string>A</string>
  <string>&lt;</string>
  <string>&gt;</string>
</ArrayOfString>
A
<
>

Verbose, slow but extremely simple and requires no additional libraries

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