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I have a Sleep model, instances of which belongs_to an instance of a Person model. I want to pass of calculation of statistics to a background thread. People self-report their data and may skip some days.

I created a Sleepstat model and plan to calculate some statistics for each day for which there is one or more recorded instances of Sleep. People may go back and edit their data later, however, so in this background task, I want to scan existing instances of Sleepstat to determine the status of the needs_updating flag.

If somebody creates a Sleep record on a day for which there is not an existing Sleepstat, then I want the background task to create the Sleepstat and calculate the statistics for that day. If somebody adds an additional Sleep record to a day that has an existing Sleepstat then I want to flag the Sleepstat as needs updating and update it with the new data, to keep the statistics up-to-date.

My thought was to do the following:

  1. Run a query to return all Sleep records belonging to the Person in question. For that, I used this query, which works as I would expect:

    all_sleeps = Sleep.select('start_time,end_time,multiday,time_zone,in_progress').where(:person_id => self.id)
    
  2. Create an array of the unique start_time dates:

    days_recorded = []
      for sleep in all_sleeps
        days_recorded.push sleep.start_time.to_date
      end
      days_recorded = days_recorded.uniq 
    
  3. For each of the days_recorded, look to see if a Sleepstat exists. If not, create one and calculate the statistics. If so, check whether it needs_updating. If so, calculate the statistics. If not, then move on to the next item in days_recorded.

    days_recorded.each do |d|
        stat = Sleepstat.where(:date => d).first
    
        if stat.nil?
          # No record, so create one because we have data for that day and calculate stats
          ...
    
        else
          # There is a record. Evaluate whether it needs to be updated
    
          if stat.needs_updating?
            # Update the Sleepstat
            ...
    
          end
    
        end
    end
    

This approach leads to a lot of independent queries:

Sleepstat Load (0.2ms)  SELECT "sleepstats".* FROM "sleepstats" WHERE "sleepstats"."date" = '2011-12-10'
Sleepstat Load (0.2ms)  SELECT "sleepstats".* FROM "sleepstats" WHERE "sleepstats"."date" = '2011-12-11'
Sleepstat Load (0.2ms)  SELECT "sleepstats".* FROM "sleepstats" WHERE "sleepstats"."date" = '2011-12-12'
Sleepstat Load (0.2ms)  SELECT "sleepstats".* FROM "sleepstats" WHERE "sleepstats"."date" = '2011-12-13'

My thought was to try to grab all of the Sleepstats first, through a query like:

existing_stats = Sleepstat.where(:date => days_recorded)

and then to iterate through them in step 3. My attempt looked like:

    existing_stats = Sleepstat.where(:date => days_recorded)

    days_recorded.each do |d|
        stat = existing_stats.where(:date => d)

        if stat.nil? || stat.length == 0
          # No record, so create one because we have data for that day and calculate stats
          ...

        else
          # There is a record. Evaluate whether it needs to be updated

          if stat.needs_updating?
            # Update the Sleepstat
            ...

          end

        end
    end

This just led to a lot of more complex individual queries:

Sleepstat Load (0.5ms)  SELECT "sleepstats".* FROM "sleepstats" WHERE "sleepstats"."date" IN ('2011-12-07', '2011-12-06', '2011-12-08', '2011-12-09', '2011-12-10', '2011-12-11', '2011-12-12', '2011-12-13', '2011-12-14', '2011-12-15') AND "sleepstats"."date" = '2011-12-10'
Sleepstat Load (0.9ms)  SELECT "sleepstats".* FROM "sleepstats" WHERE "sleepstats"."date" IN ('2011-12-07', '2011-12-06', '2011-12-08', '2011-12-09', '2011-12-10', '2011-12-11', '2011-12-12', '2011-12-13', '2011-12-14', '2011-12-15') AND "sleepstats"."date" = '2011-12-11'
Sleepstat Load (0.6ms)  SELECT "sleepstats".* FROM "sleepstats" WHERE "sleepstats"."date" IN ('2011-12-07', '2011-12-06', '2011-12-08', '2011-12-09', '2011-12-10', '2011-12-11', '2011-12-12', '2011-12-13', '2011-12-14', '2011-12-15') AND "sleepstats"."date" = '2011-12-12'
Sleepstat Load (0.4ms)  SELECT "sleepstats".* FROM "sleepstats" WHERE "sleepstats"."date" IN ('2011-12-07', '2011-12-06', '2011-12-08', '2011-12-09', '2011-12-10', '2011-12-11', '2011-12-12', '2011-12-13', '2011-12-14', '2011-12-15') AND "sleepstats"."date" = '2011-12-13'

How can I improve the efficiency of this process so that I'm not hitting the database so many times?

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

if your stats are not too heavy to calculate, you should better use a callback to calculate the stats each time a record is created or updated :

Class Sleep < ActiveRecord::Base
  before_save :create_or_update_stats

  def create_or_update_stats
    # avoid calculation if record is new or if nothing changed
    return unless ( self.new_record? || self.changed? ) 

    date = self.start_time.to_date
    stats  = Sleepstat.find_or_create_by_date( date )
    sleeps = Sleep.where( date: date )

    # now calculate the stats and save them.
  end
end

EDIT of course, you'll have to add a callback on destroy, too. you get the spirit.

extra tips :

  • don't use the for syntax. It internally calls each, so why bother ?
  • this does the same thing you do in 2):

    all_sleeps.map{|s| s.start_date.to_date }.uniq
    # or even this
    all_sleeps.map( &:start_date ).map( &:to_date ).uniq
    
  • to test if a relation is empty, use stat.exists? instead of your statement

  • if you really need to do heavy calculations, you should take a look at arel tables as they allow you to skip record instantiations and to only load the data that you need, providing a nice boost
share|improve this answer
    
Questions about sleeps = Sleep.where( date: date )... Sleep has the field start_time which I'm using to evaluate the date, so I'll need to cast that from a timestamp to a date. It's stored in UTC, however. How can I cast it to a date and retain the time zone information? Something like sleep_on_date = Sleep.select('start_time,end_time,multiday,time_zone,in_progress').where('person‌​_id = ? AND CAST(start_time AS DATE) = ?', self.id, the_date) (p.s. Using Postgres) –  Clay Dec 16 '11 at 18:10
    
mmmm. dealing with time is always tricky (btw, sorry for the mistake). Especially because when people enter a Date / time on your site, they expect that the time they specify is on their time zone. I guess the good practice would be to detect client's time zone and convert the field to UTC, and to possibly detect client's time zone when displaying to convert it back? On the other hand, it may be overkill... for a date. How many people will enter a DateTime that will effectively match with day +-1 in another timezone ? –  m_x Dec 16 '11 at 23:32
    
Your problem is centered around the night. you already have chosen that a sleep would be linked to the day people felt asleep. This is a design matter... all things rounded up, why not store your date as three integer columns (day, month, year) with an index on them ? if you seek performance, that's the way to go i think –  m_x Dec 16 '11 at 23:35
    
Well, I'm using Datetime fields at the moment, allowing them to specify a time zone (and set a default) and storing the time zone separately in a time_zone field. That may be overkill, but it works at the moment. I guess I can iterate through the records after the query, narrowing with Postgres overlaps, when I can convert the time zone properly. –  Clay Dec 17 '11 at 3:00

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