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Since AVD tools 16 I'm getting this warning:

Replace "..." with ellipsis character (..., …) ?

in my strings.xml

at this line

 <string name="searching">Searching...</string>

How do I replace ... is it just literally: &#8230;

If someone could explain this encoding please?

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As a note, I've noticed that some of Android's own translated string files use … itself rather than the Unicode entity. Given that Android XML files are normally encoded in UTF-8 anyway, I see no reason not to use the character itself rather than the potentially-esoteric Unicode entity, especially as most word processing programs these days support autocorrecting "..." to "…" (Microsoft Word does it by default, last I checked). –  JAB Feb 11 at 19:38

5 Answers 5

up vote 344 down vote accepted

&#8230; is the unicode for "" so just replace it. Its better to have it as one char/symbol than three dots.

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Thanks when I understand unicode, when I was first replacing it, eclipse was changing my & into &amp; (I had double &&) . Fixed! –  Blundell Dec 16 '11 at 15:46
21  
Why is it "better"? This complicates things when giving the text to translators. Can we somehow kill this stupid warning? Thanks –  swinefeaster Jan 2 '12 at 3:04
    
@swinefeaster Yes you can disable it in the project properties. Anyway, as a German I can guarantee you, that I prefer English over translated nonsense (when you refer to translator software, not professional ones) –  WarrenFaith Jan 2 '12 at 3:54
21  
@swinefeaster good to know :) but as they are payable, they are teachable, too :) –  WarrenFaith Jan 2 '12 at 5:17
4  
@swinefeaster It's "better" in part because it doesn't break ("..." might wrap around on e.g. the second period), and theoretically languages could render them differently (many asian languages put them in the middle and they're wider (matches a character width)). Non-breaking is useful everywhere, I'm not aware of Android rendering them correctly in other langs though, nor am I aware of UTF characters for this purpose. –  Groxx Dec 30 '13 at 23:33

To make thing short just put &#x2026; in place ...

Link to XML character Entities List

  • Look at Unicode column of HTML for row named hellip
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1  
I initially wondered why you used &#x2026; when the Eclipse warning says to use &#8230; but your link does answer that. Namely that the x signifies a hex value and 8230 in decimal is 2026 in hex. –  k2col May 27 at 21:44

If you're using eclipse then you can always do the following:

  • Right click on the warning
  • Select "Quick Fix" (shortcut is Ctrl+1 by default)
  • Select "Replace with suggested characters"

This should replace your three dots with the proper Unicode character for ellipsis.

Just a note, the latest version of ADT (21.1) sometimes won't do the replace operation properly but earlier versions had no problem doing this.

This is the character:

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This worked for me! However nothing "visual" happened other than the warning disappeared, and I'm running ADT 22.2.1. But i guess thats how it works :) –  ymerdrengene May 20 at 9:50
    
Didn't worked for me. Eclipse sugested me (I don't know why) to surroud <resources> tag with a new <element> tag. –  Leonardo Raele Aug 11 at 13:52
    
Eclipse will do that sometime if you don't exactly highlight the right area. I find myself highlighting and trying to quick fix two or three times before it actually makes the right suggestion. –  MCeley Aug 11 at 15:43

The solution to your problem is:

Go to Window -> Preferences -> Android -> Lint Error Checking

And search for "ellipsis". Change the warning level to "Info" or "Ignore".

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5  
Those suggestions do make sense. Simply ignoring them is only a solution, if you are really sure, what you are doing. In this case, the replacement makes sense, so ignoring the warning is not good. –  Alexander Pacha Dec 2 '12 at 16:29
    
Thanks! Just what I was looking for. And that's the place to do all sorts of related things (I don't need a computer to tell me how to spell, capitalize, or punctuate). Very useful! –  Scott Biggs Jan 15 '13 at 17:41

This answer is indirectly related to this question:

In my case textView1.setTextView("done&#8230"); was showing some box/chinese character. Later, I checked into fileformat.info for what the value represents and I found this is a Han character. So, what to do? I searched for "fileformat.info ellipse character" and then everything became clear to me once I saw its values are;

UTF-16 (hex) 0x2026 (2026)

UTF-16 (decimal) 8,230

So, you have several encoding available to represent a character (e.g. 10 in Decimal is represented as A in hexa) so it is very important to know when you are writing an unicode character, how receiving function decodes it. If it decodes as decimal value then you have to provide decimal value, if it accept hexadecimal then you have to provide hexadecimal.

In my case, setTextView() function accepts decimal encoded value but I was providing hexadecimal values so I was getting wrong character.

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protected by Blundell Feb 17 '13 at 12:22

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