Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm on Linux, the question is concerning shared objects of C++ classes.

The problem comes when my shared objects try to use resources linked into the main executable. I have the following codes:

loader.cpp:

#include <dlfcn.h>
#include <iostream>
#include "CommonInfo.h"

using namespace std;

int main(int argc, char** argv) {
    for(int i=1; i<argc; ++i) {
        string pth = "./";
        pth.append(argv[i]);
        void* dh = dlopen(pth.c_str(), RTLD_NOW);
        if(dh==NULL) {
            cerr << dlerror() << endl;
            return 1;
        }

        CommonInfo::GetInfoFunc getInfo = (CommonInfo::GetInfoFunc)(dlsym(dh,"getInfo"));
        if(getInfo==NULL) {
            cerr << dlerror() << endl;
            return 1;
        }

        CommonInfo* info = getInfo();
        cout << "INFO: " << info->getX() << endl;
        delete info;
    }
    return 0;
}

CommonInfo.h:

#include <string>

class CommonInfo {
    public:
        typedef CommonInfo* (*GetInfoFunc)();
    private:
        std::string x;
    public:
        CommonInfo(const std::string& nx);
        std::string getX() const;
};

EDIT: I accidentaly forgot to ctrl-c + ctrl-v the source of CommonInfo.cpp here. Of course, it is there during compilation, so CommonInfo.cpp:

#include "CommonInfo.h"

CommonInfo::CommonInfo(const std::string& nx) : x(nx) {
}

std::string CommonInfo::getX() const {
    return x;
}

A Plugin.h header:

#include "CommonInfo.h"
extern "C" CommonInfo* getInfo();

A very simple Plugin.cpp:

#include <iostream>
#include "Plugin.h"
#include "CommonInfo.h"

using namespace std;

CommonInfo* getInfo() {
    return new CommonInfo("I'm a cat!");
}

Compiling is done with:

g++ -rdynamic -ldl -Werror CommonInfo.cpp loader.cpp -o loader
g++ -shared -fPIC -Werror Plugin.cpp -o Plugin.so

Running:

./loader Plugin.so

And there goes the error:

./loader: symbol lookup error: ./Plugin.so: undefined symbol: _ZN10CommonInfoC1ERKSs

Indeed, looking inside Plugin.so with nm Plugin.so | grep -i CommonInfo it gives an 'U' for this symbol (unresolved), which is perfectly ok. Also, looking inside the binary of loader with nm loader.so | grep -i CommonInfo I could find the symbol with 'T', which is also ok. Question is, shouldn't dlfcn.h unresolve the symbol in question from the main binary? Without this feature it becomes quite hard to use these stuff... Do I have to write a class factory function for CommonInfo, load it with dlfcn from the plugin and call that?

Thanks in advance, Dennis

share|improve this question
    
(correction: Not shared objects of C++ classes, though when I started writing this post, there was a class in Plugin.so, but I stripped it out to make the error clearer.) –  dennis90 Dec 16 '11 at 16:12
    
It seems a problem related to the CommonInfo's constructor. Where is that defined? –  Emiliano Dec 16 '11 at 16:20
    
Oops yeah, it is there, I just forgot to write it here. :) –  dennis90 Dec 16 '11 at 16:24
    
FYI: $ echo _ZN10CommonInfoC1ERKSs | c++filt yields CommonInfo::CommonInfo(std::basic_string<char, std::char_traits<char>, std::allocator<char> > const&) –  Robᵩ Dec 16 '11 at 16:31
    
I'm pretty sure you need -fPIC on the executable compile line too. –  Nikolai N Fetissov Dec 16 '11 at 17:20

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

I haven't looked closely at your code, but I have in the past found behavior like you describe in the title when I did not link the executable with -E. (Or -Wl,-E when linking with gcc rather than ld.)

Note that not all platforms let the shared libraries take symbols from the calling binary. Linux and the *BSDs allow you to. But if you ever want to port to, say, Windows, you will not be able to use this pattern. I believe there are also some Unix-type OS's that won't let you do this. (It's been a while so I don't remember... Maybe it was Solaris?)

share|improve this answer
    
Well, thanks but it does not seem to solve it: Now I link with g++ -ldl -W,-E -o loader CommonInfo.o loader.o. I assume that if everything was correct, nm -D loader would show me the symbol in question... But unfortunately it doesn't do that even with the -E option. :/ Maybe I am doing something wrong when linking? –  dennis90 Dec 16 '11 at 17:17
    
IT WORKS! Your solution was correct, I just accidentaly wrote -W,-E instead of -l. Lol, what a waste of time for a simple letter... :) –  dennis90 Dec 16 '11 at 17:42
    
@asveikau: You can export symbols from EXEs on Windows. However, Windows has a two-level symbol namespace, so plugins need to explicitly request the main EXE's symbols (by linking against the main EXE's import library or calling GetProcAddress()). –  bk1e Dec 16 '11 at 18:16

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.