Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Good evening,

I was wondering if I could do something like:

while(true)
{
   MyEnum currentValue = GetMyEnumValueFromDB();
   if(currentValue == MyEnum.BreakIfYouGetThis)
      break;
   else if(currentValue == MyEnum.AlsoBreakIfYouGetThis)
      break;
   else
      //Do some computing
}

But instead of having a while(true) loop, I'd want to encapsulate the conditional logic in a Func and execute it like this:

while(new Func<bool>(/* what goes here? */))
{
   //Do some computing
}

In my case at least, it would look much cleaner, but i'm not sure how to do it (kinda new at Func/Action..).

EDIT hope this clarifies:
It could also be done like this:

while(GetMyEnumValueFromDB() != MyEnum.BreakIfYouGetThis && 
      GetMyEnumValueFromDB() != MyEnum.AlsoBreakIfYouGetThis)
{
   //Do some computing
}

But that's 2 call to the database...

Thanks =)

share|improve this question

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Well you could have:

Func<bool> condition = ...;

while (condition())
{
}

Is that what you're thinking of? It's not really clear...

EDIT: In the example you've given, I'd use something like:

private static readonly MyEnum[] BreakEnumValues = { 
    MyEnum.BreakIfYouGetThis,
    MyEnum.AlsoBreakIfYouGetThis
};

...

while (!BreakEnumValues.Contains(GetMyEnumValueFromDB()))
{
    ...
}

Or:

private static bool ShouldBreak(MyEnum enumFromDatabase)
{
    return enumFromDatabase == MyEnum.BreakIfYouGetThis ||
           enumFromDatabase == MyEnum.AlsoBreakIfYouGetThis;
}

...

while (!ShouldBreak(GetMyEnumValueFromDB))
{
    ...
}

EDIT: To counter KeithS's answer, this is entirely valid:

while (new Func<bool>(() => {
    Console.WriteLine("Evaluating...");
    return true;
})()) {
    Console.WriteLine("In loop");
    count++;
    if (count == 5)
    {
        break;
    }
}

It's horrible, but it's valid. (It can be made slightly less horrid by explicitly calling Invoke, but it's still not nice.)

share|improve this answer
    
I'd like to put the whole Func<bool> creation and calculation withing the while parenthesis. –  Baboon Dec 16 '11 at 16:56
1  
@Baboon: Why? That will create a new delegate on each iteration - I can't see what benefit that has over just putting the condition in without using a delegate. You claim something would look cleaner, but it's not at all clear why. –  Jon Skeet Dec 16 '11 at 16:58
    
I like this answer, but I'd also question why Baboon would need to create a Func to represent his condition. The expression within the Func could, if locally-scoped, be evaluated directly. The major utility of a Func in this instance would be to easily swap them out, and in that case you WANT the variable, so you can change the delegate assigned to it. –  KeithS Dec 16 '11 at 17:03
    
The function dealing with this loop is already awfully complicated, and this condition is trivial, I'd just like that loop to be more concise, and I'm interested in using funcs. Besides, creating such a tiny Func would harm performance? –  Baboon Dec 16 '11 at 17:03
1  
@Baboon: Why not just create a new method that encapsulates your logic, returning a bool, and call that in your while condition? –  Platinum Azure Dec 16 '11 at 17:09

You could do that, but if you don't have a compelling reason to do so (like you're passing the condition function in as a parameter), I'd just wrap your logic in a function and call it directly:

while(KeepGoing())
{
    //Do stuff
}

bool KeepGoing()
{
    // Check conditions for continuing
    var value = GetMyEnumValueFromDB();
    return value != MyEnum.BreakIfYouGetThis && value != MyEnum.AlsoBreakIfYouGetThis;
}
share|improve this answer
    
The condition is used only in this very place, and nowhere else. It doesn't justify adding a function IMO. –  Baboon Dec 16 '11 at 17:05
1  
Yet you want to add a delegate instead? That only makes sense if you want to swap out the condition function, and it's slower than using a function, and both are equally clear. –  Platinum Azure Dec 16 '11 at 17:10

First off, a database call in a while loop is a bad idea. Query what you'll need beforehand and loop accordingly.

It appears that polymorphism can be your friend here. If you need to keep the same flow, you can do something like this:

interface IWhileLoopContinuable
{
   bool KeepGoing {get;}
   void DoWork();
}

Then you can use TakeWhile on this enumerable:

foreach(var item in queriedAsIWhileLoopContinuable.TakeWhile(c => c.KeepGoing))
{
   item.DoWork();
}

All that being said, you could just query for what you want and work on that.

share|improve this answer
    
That sounds hacky.. and i don't have a collection. –  Baboon Dec 16 '11 at 17:28
    
@Baboon: You could have a collection if you'd query your values prior to looping... You'd also get the performance increase of a single database call. –  Austin Salonen Dec 16 '11 at 17:33
    
The database call is necessary, because each time i loop, the value may have change (the workflow where i work at is done entirely in SQL, (GUI as well sic)). The DoWork is mostly a Thread.Sleep() –  Baboon Dec 16 '11 at 18:15
    
If you're waiting for a change in the database, might something here work better for you? link –  That Chuck Guy Dec 16 '11 at 18:30
1  
@Baboon: There's a link in this comment thread that may interest you. –  Austin Salonen Dec 16 '11 at 19:58

Well, first off you cannot "new" a Func, just like you can't new up any delegate type. You must instead assign an existing named method or function literal (aka anonymous delegate, lambda, etc) to initialize a Func variable.

//these won't compile; Func has no constructor
Func<bool> condition = new Func<bool>();

//As Jon Skeet notes, these will compile because of language-provided syntax,
//even though Funcs have no constructor with a delegate parameter.
Func<bool> condition = new Func<bool>(SomeNamedMethodReturnsBool);
Func<bool> condition = new Func<bool>(()=>true);

//and these will compile because you're directly assigning the delegate
Func<bool> condition = SomeNamedMethodReturnsBool;
Func<bool> condition = ()=>true;

You actually cannot do what you want in C#; an anonymous delegate must be assigned to a variable or parameter in order to be used. It cannot be used in-place as a "function literal" in the abstract sense.

Even if you could, the utility of such a statement escapes me. The delegate would not be re-instantiated every time (the compiler turns anonymous delegates into named private functions of the containing class, with mashup names), but you're adding a layer onto the call stack just to evaluate a constant expression that could be placed directly into the parenthesis of the while() statement. The main utility of an anonymous delegate would be that you could swap out lambdas at runtime, and in order to do that you MUST have a variable.

share|improve this answer
    
the while (delegate { return true; }()) looks good but it says a method name is expected. –  Baboon Dec 16 '11 at 17:26
    
Yeah, you actually cannot use either of these syntaxes; when defining an anonymous delegate you must assign it to a variable or parameter; it cannot be used as an in-place "function literal". –  KeithS Dec 16 '11 at 17:37
    
And +1 for reminding that the delegate wouldn't be reinstantiated every time. –  Baboon Dec 16 '11 at 18:21
    
-1: This is incorrect - the last two of your supposedly invalid lines actually do compile. It's not calling a constructor, but it's using a delegate creation expression. See my answer for an example of how it could be used, even though I think it shouldn't be. –  Jon Skeet Dec 16 '11 at 18:42

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.