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I have the following HTML code, which essentially copies a textarea box, including its text.

<!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.01 Transitional//EN" "http://www.w3.org/TR/html4/loose.dtd">
<html>
    <head>
        <title>Test Page</title>
        <script type="text/javascript">
            function copyTextarea() {
                var originalTextbox = document.getElementById('originalTextarea');
                var copiedTextboxSpan = document.getElementById('copiedTextareaSpan');

                var text = originalTextbox.value;

                copiedTextboxSpan.innerHTML = '<textarea name="myNewTextarea" rows="5" cols="50"></textarea>';

                var newTextbox = document.getElementsByName('myNewTextarea')[0];
                newTextbox.innerHTML = text;
            }
        </script>
    </head>
    <body>
        Enter your text:
        <br />
        <textarea id="originalTextarea" rows="5" cols="50"></textarea>
        <br />
        <input type="button" value="Copy Textarea" onclick="copyTextarea()" />
        <br />
        Copied text:
        <br />
        <span id="copiedTextareaSpan"></span>
    </body>
</html>

This is a very simplified version of HTML I have, so please don't suggest huge changes. I need to create the textarea box and set its text separately, etc.

This code seems simple and works fine, except when it comes to newline characters. For some reason, Internet Explorer (IE) always converts newlines into a single space. Stranger still, this was not happening locally on my Tomcat server, but crept up when I deployed to the test server. But on the test server, it is working fine in Chrome, Firefox, etc.

Does anyone know what might be happening? I don't know too much about JavaScript, but I think it's the browser that executes the code. But if that is true, why does IE have no problems locally but has a problem on the test server?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Try creating actual DOM objects:

newTextarea = document.createElement('textarea');
newTextarea.setAttribute('name', 'myNewTextarea');
newTextarea.setAttribute('rows', '5');
newTextarea.setAttribute('cols', '50');

copiedTextboxSpan.appendChild(newTextarea);

var newTextbox = document.getElementsByName('myNewTextarea')[0];
newTextbox.value = text;

Also, use value instead of innerHTML when dealing with a textarea.

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No luck. Strangely enough, IE is now not even copying over the text. It works fine locally, but on the server it has a JavaScript error complaining about 'undefined' when trying to set the new textarea value. I put in some alerts. On the server, IE says that getElementsByName returns a [object], while locally it says it returns a [object HTMLCollection]. Meanwhile, Chrome on the server says it's a [object NodeList] –  Rachel G. Dec 16 '11 at 17:29
    
I'm not sure what the error is, in that case. If you were using jQuery, it normalizes the browser inconsistencies quite well. I can help rewrite your code if you do use it, as it is literally a few lines. –  Blender Dec 16 '11 at 17:31
    
I don't know jQuery. I tried $('textarea[name=myNewTextarea]').val(text);, but the text did not get displayed. Is there something wrong? –  Rachel G. Dec 16 '11 at 17:43
    
Post your jQuery code an I'll see what I can do. –  Blender Dec 16 '11 at 17:46
    
I didn't change anything to my original code except replace the last 2 lines with that $('textarea[name=myNewTextarea]').val(text);. –  Rachel G. Dec 16 '11 at 17:49

If you can live with jQuery:

$('#copiedTextareaSpan').replaceWith(function () {
    var text = $('#originalTextarea').val();
    return '<textarea name="myNewTextarea" rows="5" cols="50">' + text + '</textarea>';
});

copies the text from originalTextarea to copiedTextArea (after creating it).

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