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I have something like $string = ABC_RPM_LOL and GELO_FRE_OPN I would like to extract ABC and GELO. (The word before 1st underscore).

What is the quickest way to achieve this using Perl?

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Thanks alot guys.. all these answers are indeed insightful – Ron Dec 16 '11 at 19:56
up vote 5 down vote accepted

A regex you could use is:

$string =~ /^([A-Z]+)_/;
$value = $1;

This assumes that your words are made up of only upper-case letters. If they're mixed case, throw an i on the end of the regex: /^([A-Z]+)_/i.

Edit: Since you asked for the quickest way, here's a benchmark comparing my regex and Lazarus's split:

#!perl

use strict;
use warnings;

use Benchmark qw/ :all /;

my $string = "ABC_RPM_LOL";
my $value;

my $count = 10_000_000;
cmpthese( $count, {
    'regex' => sub { $string =~ /^([A-Z]+)_/; $value = $1; },
        'split' => sub { ($value) = split /_/, $string; }
});

The results:

           Rate regex split
regex 1869159/s    --  -29%
split 2624672/s   40%    --

So split is a heck of a lot quicker.

Edit the second: I added three of the other answers here:

'split2' => sub { $value = (split('_',$string))[0]; },
'split3' => sub { ($value) = split /_/, $string, 2; },
'substr' => sub { $value = substr $string, 0, index $string, '_'; },

And the new results:

            Rate  regex split2 split3  split substr
regex  1848429/s     --    -8%   -27%   -28%   -63%
split2 2008032/s     9%     --   -21%   -22%   -60%
split3 2538071/s    37%    26%     --    -1%   -50%
split  2570694/s    39%    28%     1%     --   -49%
substr 5050505/s   173%   152%    99%    96%     --

tadmc's substr answer is the fastest by a huge margin.

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1  
You do realize that split and split3 are identical right? perl -MO=Deparse -e'($value) = split /_/, $string;' ( Ok there may be a very slight compilation penalty ) – Brad Gilbert Dec 16 '11 at 19:59
    
Great answer but by your own admission @tacmc actually delivered the correct one, +1 never the less. Good work! – Lazarus Dec 17 '11 at 8:52
    
@Lazarus: Yeah, I would have given tadmc the checkmark for getting the right answer. :) – CanSpice Dec 19 '11 at 17:10
    
@CanSpice: Ah well, it was good work and a cracking bit of analysis so I would have wanted to +1 more than once anyway. I learnt something, thanks. – Lazarus Dec 20 '11 at 10:22

My experience tells me that Ron is new to programming.

"Quickest" is very seldom corresponds with "best"...

But, if we really want quickest, I'd start with substr/index:

my $word1 = substr $_, 0, index $_, '_';

If I thought that "Quickest" was not a simple case of premature optimiztion, then I would benchmark several different ways to answer that question.

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There is no need to split the string into more than two.

When split is specified the optional third parameter, it will use it to limit the number of resultant strings (and subsequently work done):

my ( $word ) = split /_/, $str, 2;
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1  
Actually my ( $word ) = split /_/, $str; is transformed into my ( $word ) = split /_/, $str, 2; at compile time. perl -MO=Deparse -e'my ( $word ) = split /_/, $str' So you really don't need to specify the limit. – Brad Gilbert Dec 16 '11 at 19:47
    
@BradGilbert : Cool, I didn't know that! – Zaid Dec 17 '11 at 7:05

you need something like

$abc = split('_', $string)[0] # when string = ABC_RPM_LOL
$gelo = split('_', $string)[0] # when string = GELO_FRE_OPN
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1  
($abc) = split /_/, $string; transforms into ($abc) = split /_/, $string, 2; which stops it from having to do more work than it really needs to. – Brad Gilbert Dec 16 '11 at 19:50

I wouldn't use a Regex for this, the humble split function is your friend.

$extract = (split(/_/, $string))[0];
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2  
($extract) = split /_/, $string; – Brad Gilbert Dec 16 '11 at 17:17
    
($extract) = split /_/, $string, 2; should be a few percent faster, and maybe much more if you have lots of underscores in the string. – David Brigada Dec 16 '11 at 18:33
1  
Actually @DavidBrigada, ($extract) = split /_/, $string; is transformed into ($extract) = split /_/, $string, 2; at compile time. perl -MO=Deparse -e'($extract) = split /_/, $string' – Brad Gilbert Dec 16 '11 at 19:41

One way:

#!/usr/bin/env perl
use strict;
use warnings;
my $string="ABC_RPM_LOL and GELO_FRE_OPN";
my @list = ( $string =~ m{(?:\b|\s)(\w+?)_}g );
print "@list\n";
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