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I'm trying to master continuation passing style (CPS) and am therefore reworking an example shown to me by Gary Short quite a while ago. I don't have his sample source code so I'm trying to rework his example from memory. Consider the following code:

let checkedDiv m n =
    match n with
    | 0.0 -> None
    | _ -> Some(m/n)

let reciprocal r = checkedDiv 1.0 r

let resistance c1 c2 c3 =
     (fun c1 -> if (reciprocal c1).IsSome then 
        (fun c2 -> if (reciprocal c2).IsSome then
            (fun c3 -> if (reciprocal c3).IsSome then 
                Some((reciprocal c1).Value + (reciprocal c2).Value + (reciprocal c3).Value))));;

What I can't quite figure out is how to structure the resistance function. I came up with this earlier:

let resistance r1 r2 r3 =
        if (reciprocal r1).IsSome then
            if (reciprocal r2).IsSome then
                if (reciprocal r3).IsSome then
                    Some((reciprocal r1).Value + (reciprocal r2).Value + (reciprocal r3).Value)
                else
                    None
            else
                None
        else
            None 

but, of course, that's not using CPS--not to mention the fact that it seems really hacky and there's quite a bit of repeated code which also seems like a code smell.

Can someone show me how to rewrite the resistance function in a CPS way?

share|improve this question
    
Can you use computation expressions? Or is that not CPS-compliant? –  Shlomo Dec 16 '11 at 17:43
    
@Shlomo--that's not a bad suggestion but it's sort of putting the cart before the horse. I'm trying to master CPS because CPS is part of the structure of computation expressions. –  Onorio Catenacci Dec 16 '11 at 17:51

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

straightforward way:

let resistance_cps c1 c2 c3 = 
    let reciprocal_cps r k = k (checkedDiv 1.0 r)
    reciprocal_cps c1 <| 
        function
        | Some rc1 -> 
            reciprocal_cps c2 <| 
                function
                | Some rc2 -> 
                    reciprocal_cps c3 <|
                        function 
                        | Some rc3 -> Some (rc1 + rc2 + rc3)
                        | _ -> None
                | _ -> None
        | _ -> None

or a bit shorter with Option.bind

let resistance_cps2 c1 c2 c3 = 
    let reciprocal_cps r k = k (checkedDiv 1.0 r)
    reciprocal_cps c1 <|
        Option.bind(fun rc1 -> 
            reciprocal_cps c2 <| 
                Option.bind(fun rc2 ->
                    reciprocal_cps c3 <| 
                        Option.bind(fun rc3 -> Some (rc1 + rc2 + rc3))
                )
        )
share|improve this answer

This is a known task from "Programming F#" book by Chris Smith; the CPS-style solution code is given on page 244 there:

let let_with_check result restOfComputation =
    match result with
    | DivByZero -> DivByZero
    | Success(x) -> restOfComputation x

let totalResistance r1 r2 r3 =
    let_with_check (divide 1.0 r1) (fun x ->
    let_with_check (divide 1.0 r2) (fun y ->
    let_with_check (divide 1.0 r3) (fun z ->
    divide 1.0 (x + y + z) ) ) )
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the reference; I've got Chris Smith's book so I'll read that portion of it. –  Onorio Catenacci Dec 16 '11 at 17:53

Using the Maybe monad defined here

let resistance r1 r2 r3 =
  maybe {
    let! r1 = reciprocal r1
    let! r2 = reciprocal r2
    let! r3 = reciprocal r3
    return r1 + r2 + r3
  }
share|improve this answer
    
That's not a bad suggestion but I'm trying to work up to understanding monads and understanding CPS is part of understanding monads. –  Onorio Catenacci Dec 16 '11 at 17:50
    
Then maybe a useful exercise would be desugaring this by looking at the definition of Bind. –  Daniel Dec 16 '11 at 19:16
    
@Daniel--good suggestion. –  Onorio Catenacci Dec 16 '11 at 19:53

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