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Consider the following program:

int main() {

    while(...) {
        int* foobar = new int;
    }

    return 0;
}

When does foobar go out of scope?

I know when using new, attributes are allocated on the heap and need to be deleted manually with delete, in the code above, it is causing a memory leak. However, what about scope?

I thought it would go out of scope as soon as the while loop terminates, because you have no direct access to it anymore. For example, you cannot delete it after the loop has terminated.

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This is tricky, because foobar is a pointer, which correctly goes out of scope and it destroyed (but the object it points at is not deallocated). The int is an object on the heap, has no scope, and since you have no delete call, it is leaked. –  Mooing Duck Dec 16 '11 at 18:04

8 Answers 8

up vote 9 down vote accepted

Be careful here, foobar is local to the while loop, but the allocation on the heap has no scope and will only be destructed if you call delete on it.

The variable and the allocation are not linked in any way as far as the compiler is concerned. Indeed, the allocation happens at run time, so the compiler never even sees it.

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3  
I recommend std::unique_ptr<int> –  Mooing Duck Dec 16 '11 at 18:04
7  
@MooingDuck: I recommend int ;-p –  Steve Jessop Dec 16 '11 at 18:07
6  
@SteveJessop: An int a day keeps the pointer away... –  Kerrek SB Dec 16 '11 at 18:26

foobar is a local variable that goes out of scope at the end of the block.

*foobar is a dynamically allocated object with manual lifetime. Since it doesn't have scoped lifetime, the question makes no sense -- it doesn't have a scope out of which it could go. Its lifetime is managed manually, and the object lives until you delete it.

Your question is dangerously burdened with prejudice and preconceptions. It is best to approach C++ with a clean mind and an open attitude. Only that way will you be able to appreciate the language's wonders to the fullest.


Here's the clean and open approach: Do think about 1) storage classes (automatic, static, dynamic), 2) object lifetime (scoped, permanent, manual), 3) object semantics (value (copies) vs reference (aliases)), 4) RAII and single-responsiblity classes. Purge your mind of a) stack/heap, b) pointers, c) new/delete, d) destructors/copy constructors/assignment operators.

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You can't entirely purge your mind of assignment operators, because even once you get everything else right, you have to explicitly default the move ctor and move assignment for your value-semantics classes :-) –  Steve Jessop Dec 16 '11 at 18:28
1  
+1 for the clean and open approach, although it should be in bigger font instead of smaller ;-P –  AJG85 Dec 16 '11 at 18:29
1  
@SteveJessop: The standing order is, as always: Once you understand why you can ignore the advice, it's safe to ignore the advice :-) (Though if you don't declare anything, you should get the most optimal move semantics automatically, non?) –  Kerrek SB Dec 16 '11 at 18:32
    
@Kerrek: you're right, I misremembered the conditions for the implicitly-declared move constructor. I think that provided you only use value-semantics classes as data members (plus shared_ptr if absolutely necessary), you coast through without doing anything at all. –  Steve Jessop Dec 16 '11 at 18:36
    
@SteveJessop: "Not doing anything at all" is my life goal. C++ is just my way to get there. –  Kerrek SB Dec 16 '11 at 18:38

That's a pretty awesome memory leak. You have a variable on the stack pointing to the memory allocated on the heap. You need to delete the memory on the heap before you lose the reference to it when the while loop scope ends. Alternately if you don't want to fuss with memory management always use smart pointers to own the raw memory on the heap and let it clean itself up.

#include <memory>
int main() {

    while(...) {
        std::unique_ptr<int> foobar = new int;
    } // smart pointer foobar deletes the allocated int each iteration

    return 0;
}
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The pointer (foobar) will go out of scope right as the program gets to the closing brace of the while loop. So if the expression in the ... remains true, memory will be leaked every time the loop executes as you have lost a handle to the allocated object as of that closing brace.

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1  
you use it and that variable, without clarifying either. The pointer goes out of scope, the pointee/object will be leaked, because it has no scope. –  Mooing Duck Dec 16 '11 at 18:02
    
Q: "When does foobar go out of scope?", A: "It will go out of scope..." I'm clearly talking about foobar. The only variable in question is foobar, the pointee/object isn't a variable. Updated regardless... –  arasmussen Dec 16 '11 at 18:05
    
While the answer was correct, it was misleading as the OP clearly wasn't distinguishing between the pointer and the pointee. –  Mooing Duck Dec 16 '11 at 18:20

Here foobar is an int pointer occupying memory in the stack. The int instance you are creating dynamically with new goes to heap. When foobar goes out of scope, you lose the reference to it, so you cannot delete the memory allocated in the heap.

The best solution would be:

while(--)
{
    int foobar;
}//it goes out of scope here. deleted from stack automatically!!

If you still want to use the dynamic allocation then do this:

while(--)
{
    int* foobar=new int;
    //do your work here!
    delete foobar; //This deletes the heap memory allocated!
    foobar=NULL;   //avoid dangling pointer! :)
}
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foobar goes out of scope after each interation of the loop.

The memory you allocate and assign to foobar is being leaked, in that it is still allocated on the heap but no references to it are available in the program.

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Since foobar is declared in the body of the loop, it goes out of scope at the end of every iteration of the loop. It is then redeclared, and new memory is allocated again and again until the loop ends. The actual object that foobar points to never goes out of scope. Scope doesn't apply to dynamically allocated(aka heap) objects, only to automatic(stack) objects.

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Foobar the pointer is created on the stack, but the new int is created on the heap. In the case of the while loop, each time the code loops, foobar falls out scope. The newly created int persists on the heap. On each iteration a new int is created, and the pointer is reset, which means the pointer no longer can access any of the previous int(s) on the heap.

What seems to be lacking, in every one of the previous answers, and even in this one, is the heap falling out of scope. Maybe, I am getting the terminology incorrect, but I know that at some point the heap is reset, too. It may occur once the program no longer runs, or when the computer is turned off, but I know it occurs.

Let us look at this question from a different perspective. I have written any number of programs, which leak memory. Over all the years, I have owned my computer, I am positive, I have leaked over 2 gigabytes of memory. My computer only has 1 gig of memory. Therefore, if the heap NEVER falls out of scope, then my computer has some magical memory. Would one of you care to explain when exactly the heap falls out of scope?

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