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Pretty much as the title says, that was the simplest way I could explain it. To elaborate...

I first need to find the value of column c that has been duplicated the most times (mostDuplicated), and then SELECT * FROM t WHERE c=mostDuplicated

To go on about it further...

Here's my data:

SELECT * FROM t

a, b, c
-  -  -
1, 1, 1
2, 2, 1
3, 3, 1
4, 4, 2
5, 5, 3

So ignore the values in columns a & b completely, just concentrate on column c. I need to find the most duplicated value in column c (which is 1), and then SELECT only these records WHERE c=1. I want to do this in a single query if possible.

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1  
What if there were tied "most duplicate" values of c? –  Martin Smith Dec 16 '11 at 18:05
    
@MartinSmith: Good question, then I suppose it doesn't matter which one is selected, BUT it still does only have to be one value in the where clause. –  Drahcir Dec 16 '11 at 18:06

4 Answers 4

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Do a "group by" query to count the number of unique values of c, order it descending and select only the top row. Then use the output as a subquery to select rows with that particular value of c:

SELECT * FROM t WHERE c = (SELECT c FROM t GROUP BY c ORDER BY COUNT(*) DESC LIMIT 1)
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Best answer, with fewest sub-queries. Thanks –  Drahcir Dec 16 '11 at 18:51

SELECT c FROM t GROUP BY c ORDER BY count(*) DESC LIMIT 1

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Thanks, but this will only select 1 row, I want to know the values of columns a & b where c=1. This will only select 1 row –  Drahcir Dec 16 '11 at 18:16
    
Then SELECT * FROM t WHERE c = (SELECT c FROM t GROUP BY c ORDER BY COUNT(*) DESC LIMIT 1) and please specify that in your question next time :) –  Kenaniah Dec 16 '11 at 18:17
    
It is specified in the question. The other 2 answerers noticed it. –  Martin Smith Dec 16 '11 at 18:21
    
stick with the solution from this answer, just remove select c with select *, don't use the one with the subquery –  cristian Dec 16 '11 at 18:33
    
@Octopus-Paul good point. I wrote that out as a db-agnostic query out of habit. –  Kenaniah Dec 16 '11 at 18:36

Well it will be, like this:

SELECT * FROM t WHERE c = 
               (SELECT c FROM 
                    (SELECT c, count(c) as co 
                            FROM t ORDER BY co DESC LIMIT 1))

Hope this help

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Here you go, it's a bit convoluted:

SELECT
    *
FROM
    t
WHERE
(
    c IN
    (
        SELECT c
        FROM (
                SELECT
                    c,
                    COUNT(c) as freq
                FROM
                    t
                GROUP BY
                    c
                ORDER BY
                    freq DESC,
                    c ASC
                LIMIT 1
            ) AS t2
    )
)

Basically, it's going this: 1. determine how often each value of C is repeated 2. select the value of the MAXimum repeats 3. use that value to determine what value of C to use when select * from the entire table.

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