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I am circling through LinkedBlockingQueue millions of Strings. The reading thread should end its execution when there are no more items in source.

I thought about putting a dummy value like "SHUTDOWN" in LinkedBlockingQueue.

The reader does this:

while ((data = (String)MyLinkedBlockingQueue.take()).equals("SHUTDOWN") == false) {
    //read and live 
}

Is it efficient to execute equals on every string? If not what can I use instead?

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3 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You are on the right track. This is the standard idiom for finishing processing of a BlockingQueue, it's called the "poison pill". i usually implement it using a special private static final instance so you can do object equality and don't risk overlapping with a real value. e.g.:

private static final String SHUTDOWN = new String("SHUTDOWN"); // use new String() so you don't get an interned value

public void readQueue() {
  while ((data = (String)MyLinkedBlockingQueue.take()) != SHUTDOWN) {
      //read and live 
  }
}

public void shutdownQueue() {
  MyLinkedBlockingQueue.put(SHUTDOWN);
}
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Note that this has the side effect that the only way to shut down the queue is to call shutdownQueue(). Conversely, if you used the string literal (and/or called intern()) then anybody could shut down the queue by calling put("SHUTDOWN"). Which one you want would depend on the semantics you intend. –  Daniel Pryden Dec 16 '11 at 19:23
    
@DanielPryden - well, anybody can shutdown the queue by calling shutdownQueue() as well. and this way keeps the queue management logic well encapsulated. –  jtahlborn Dec 16 '11 at 19:28
    
@jtahlborn, can you please explain why I can't use interned string? –  jullin Dec 16 '11 at 20:02
    
@jullin: That's what my comment was about. You could use an interned string, but that would allow anybody to insert the literal string "SHUTDOWN" instead of calling shutdownQueue(). Keeping the String instance private enforces that only the the class's special SHUTDOWN value can be used to shut down the queue, instead of any String that happens to contain the characters "SHUTDOWN". As I said in my comment, which one you want depends on the semantics you intend. But I think jtahlborn makes a good point that keeping the logic encapsulated is probably the better way to go. –  Daniel Pryden Dec 16 '11 at 20:08
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You can also think of using poll() and ending the loop when it returns null.

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not good, because queue can be idle for some time but source have more data to put. –  jullin Dec 16 '11 at 19:15
    
Ok. Then if you are concerned about efficiency of equals() why not make SHUTDOWN a constant and use '==' for comparison? –  AKJ Dec 16 '11 at 19:17
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This could be implemented so that you don't have to check for the "poison pill" every time. Consider making use of a ThreadPoolExecutor that works on your LinkedBlockingQueue. When you want to shut down processing, call the shutdown() method on the executor object. From the documentation of that method:

Initiates an orderly shutdown in which previously submitted tasks are executed, but no new tasks will be accepted. Invocation has no additional effect if already shut down.

See this post if you're interested in shutting down processing immediately while tasks are still pending in the queue: With a Java ExecutorService, how do I complete actively executing tasks but halt the processing of waiting tasks?

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