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I have a many-to-many table relationship in MySQL involving three tables: tickets, ticket_solutions, and solutions. (A ticket may have multiple solutions, and solutions apply to multiple tickets.)

Here are the table structures, simplified:

tickets    ticket_solutions    solutions
-----      -----               -----
id         ticket_id           id
           solution_id         solution

(In this example, all fields are INT except solutions.solution which is VARCHAR.) Since some tickets aren't completed, they may not have any solutions.

I've written the following query:

SELECT t.id, GROUP_CONCAT(DISTINCT sol.solution SEPARATOR ', ') solutions
FROM tickets t
LEFT JOIN ticket_solutions tsol ON (tsol.ticket_id = t.id)
LEFT JOIN solutions sol ON (tsol.solution_id = sol.id)
GROUP BY t.id DESC;

My question lies with the second LEFT JOIN. In any situation where an entry exists in the linker table (ticket_solutions) for a given ticket, there will always be a record to match in solutions. However if I try to use an INNER JOIN instead, I no longer get tickets which lack solutions.

To my thinking, the only time NULL values will occur is in the relationship between tickets and the linker table. (Ticket without any solutions yet.)

Must I use a LEFT JOIN between the linker table and solutions even though there won't be NULL values in that particular relationship?

If not, what is the recommended query structure?

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3 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Try it this way:

SELECT t.id, GROUP_CONCAT(DISTINCT sol.solution SEPARATOR ', ') solutions
    FROM tickets t
        LEFT JOIN ticket_solutions tsol 
            INNER JOIN solutions sol 
                ON (tsol.solution_id = sol.id)
            ON (tsol.ticket_id = t.id)
    GROUP BY t.id DESC;
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This is exactly what I was looking for. Thank you. –  JYelton Dec 16 '11 at 19:41
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In your original SQL you left-join tickets to ticket_solutions, then inner-join the resulting view to solutions, which will supress rows without a corresponding solution.

In Joe Stefanelli's answer, which could also be written as

SELECT t.id, GROUP_CONCAT(DISTINCT sol.solution SEPARATOR ', ')
FROM tickets t
LEFT JOIN
    (SELECT ticket_solutions.ticket_id AS id, solutions.solution AS solution
     FROM ticket_solutions tsol 
     INNER JOIN solutions ON ticket_solutions.solution_id=solutions.id
    ) AS sol ON t.id=sol.id

you first inner-join ticket_solutions to solutions, then left-join the resulting view to tickets, thus NOT supressing the empty tickets.

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The answer of Joe Stefanelli is absolutely right. Just wanted to add that you can use

IFNULL(GROUP_CONCAT(DISTINCT sol.solution SEPARATOR ', '), '')

to have an empty string instead of nulls.

However, since some other discussions about the same problem are confusing, just wanted to link this fiddle as well: http://www.sqlfiddle.com/#!2/54c6f/3/0

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