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Give a C++ class foo, inside, it has a synchronized method. We have two objects of foo, called, f1 and f2, if f1 and f2 are concurrently running, can we guarantee the synchronized method being accessed by only one thread?

My idea:

Use a mutex, whoever needs to access the method, who get the mutex.

This interview question seems not to be so simple.

Any solutions ?

thanks

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The first two ways I can think of are to use a static synchronized method or to use a mutex like you said. –  jli Dec 16 '11 at 19:40
1  
Are you asking how to guarantee access by only one thread at a time, or only one thread during the lifetime of the process? –  Andy Thomas Dec 16 '11 at 19:41
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4 Answers

In java, unless the method is static, you need to synchronize externally in order to ensure the method is only called by one thread at one time.

You can also synchronize the method itself on a static variable of the class. E.g.

public class myClass
{
  private static Object myLock = new Object();

  public void myMethod()
  {
    synchronized(myLock)
    {
      // ...
    }
  }
}
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With a static method you'd do the following in Java:

class Foo {

   public static synchronized void mymethod() {
      ...
   }
}

You actually synchronize on Foo.class in this case.

If you have an instance method (i.e. non-static) and you need to synchronize, you could put a synchronized block into the method and synchronize on any object even on the class itself:

public void mymethod() {
  synchronized( Foo.class ) {
    ...
  }
}

Note that this would synchronize access to other static synchronized methods in the same class du to the shared lock object Foo.class.

Btw, the answer to that question depends on the definition of accessed: Multiple threads can access the method by trying to invoke it, read its reflection metadata or even enter it in case of nested synchronized blocks but they would normally not execute it concurrently unless parts of the method are not synchronized (or synchronized on a different lock object).

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This only works if the class is loaded by only one class loader. If two class loaders load the same class, the methods in the two class instances will be synchronizing on different objects. They could then execute simultaneously. –  Ted Hopp Dec 16 '11 at 20:15
    
@TedHopp good point –  Thomas Dec 16 '11 at 20:23
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If I understand you correctly and you want it synchronized across all instances make the method static synchronized

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If you have two different instances of class foo, then it does not matter what happens because each has a different copy of the method and the synchronization happens on the this object:

public synchronized void method() {
    // code
}

is equivalent to:

public void method() {
   synchronized(this) {
      // code
   }
}

Having said this, if each thread calls method from a different instance of foo:

  1. they will acquire different locks
  2. they will not produce any data race if you are not modifying data outside of class foo
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