Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I was told in my class that I have to write and test my code in the main method, I wrote it, but I dont know how to test it. How I am supposed to test my methods? I am supposed to take user input, and then get the get the first letter, last letter, etc.

import java.util.Scanner;

public class Word
{
    public static void main(String[] args)
    {

    }

    public String word;

    public void Word()
    {
        String word = "";
    }

    public void Word(String word1)
    {
        String word = word1;
    }

    public String getWord()
    {
        return word;
    }   

    public void setWord(String newWord)
    {
        String word = newWord;
    }

    public void getFirstLetter()
    {
        String firstLetter = word.substring(0, 1);
    }

    public void getLastLetter()
    {
        String lastLetter = word.substring(word.length() - 1, word.length());
    }

    public void removeFirstLetter()
    {
        String noFirstLetter = word.substring(1, word.length());
    }

    public void removeLastLetter()
    {
        String noLastLetter = word.substring(0, word.length() - 1);
    }
    public int findLetter (String parameter)
    {
        word.indexOf(parameter);
        return 1;
    }
}
share|improve this question
    
Is this homework? –  BryceAtNetwork23 Dec 16 '11 at 20:01
    
Yes, but not for school, this is for an outside of school class. –  Jerryg225 Dec 16 '11 at 20:02
1  
Start by putting some code in your main method, perhaps. Create Word objects and call methods and such. –  Hovercraft Full Of Eels Dec 16 '11 at 20:03
3  
<yorkshire_accent>Ah, the youth of today -- you don't know how lucky you have it! When i was learning programming, we had to write our code on paper, translate to fortran, create punch cards from the code, then submit our punch cards to the computing laboratory for an over-night run. Then debug and repeat the whole process again!</yorkshire_accent> Now-a-days, you've got your computing laboratory right on your desktop in your very own home -- so experiment! Create code, bad code, good code, any code! Just create, test, modify, and above all, try! –  Hovercraft Full Of Eels Dec 16 '11 at 20:11

5 Answers 5

You test your methods by calling them with some defined input and compare the results with your expected output.

Example:

Suppose you have a method like this:

public static int add(int a, int b) {
  return a + b;
}

You'd test it like this:

int result = add( 3, 5);
if( result != 8 ) {
  //method is wrong
} 

So basically you define a "contract" of what input the method gets and what the result should be (in terms of return value or other changed state). Then you check whether you get that result for your input and if so you can assume the method works correctly.

In order to be quite sure (you often can't be perfectly sure) you'd test the method several times with different types of input (as many as reasonable, to test different cases, e.g. short words, long words).

You often also test how your method handles wrong input, e.g. by passing null or empty strings.

share|improve this answer

You should have a look at tools like junit.

You can create a simple Test class and test your class and its behavior.

imports ...;

public class MyTest{

    @Test
    public void testMyClass(){
        Word w= new Word();
        w.setWord("test");
        Assert.assertEquals(w.getFirstLetter(), "t");
    }
}

With tools like Eclipse you could nicely run such a test.

share|improve this answer
    
I just figured that your getFirstLetter actually isn't a getter. However this should show how testing could be done in general... –  Udo Held Dec 16 '11 at 22:11
    
Except because getFirstLetter() has a return type of void, the test code won't compile. But I agree, he should learn how to use JUnit (or similar); it'd point out all the problems his code has right off (once the return type is changed, the test will end up getting NPEs) –  Clockwork-Muse Dec 16 '11 at 22:15

Just a hint: you're very close you need an instance of Word, than you can call your methods

public static void main(String[] args) {
      Word test = new Word();
      test.setWord("something");
      // here you might read javadoc of the String class on how to compare strings
}

EDIT: I overlooked this:

public void setWord(String newWord)
{
     String word = newWord;
}

The code you've written creates a variable word and newWord is assigned to it and then disappears. If you (obviously) want to set a member of a class you should use this wich references the instance (you created in main()).

public void setWord(String newWord) {
   this.word = newWord;
}
share|improve this answer
    
So test.setWord("somthing"); could be user input with the scanner? –  Jerryg225 Dec 16 '11 at 20:14
    
Well this is what I had, then when I printed test.word it would print "null" –  Jerryg225 Dec 16 '11 at 20:20
    
@Jerryg225 "something" needs to be a String from whatever source. 2nd I've updated my answer. –  stacker Dec 16 '11 at 21:45

Since I would say this is homework, I will try not to explicitly give the answer. In the main method, you should set your word, then call each method and print the output to verify it is correct.

share|improve this answer

Agree with Jason. If you wanna test something, simply System.out.println() it. In your methods though, your return type is not a String but a void, so you could change that, and print it out on the main program run.

If not, just put the System.out.println() in your void methods. Shouldn't have much of a problem!

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.