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I would like to calculate the minimum number of consecutive elements in a vector that when added (consecutively) would be less than a given value.

For example in the following vector

ev<-c(0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 
0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 
0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 
0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 
0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 
0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 
0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 
0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 
0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 
0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 2.7, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 
0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 3.27, 0, 
0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 370.33, 1375.4, 
1394.03, 1423.8, 1360, 1269.77, 1378.8, 1350.37, 1425.97, 1423.6, 
1363.4, 1369.87, 1365.5, 1294.97, 1362.27, 1117.67, 1026.97, 
1077.4, 1356.83, 565.23, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 
0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 356.83, 
973.5, 0, 240.43, 1232.07, 1440, 1329.67, 1096.87, 1331.37, 1305.03, 
1328.03, 1246.03, 1182.3, 1054.53, 723.03, 1171.53, 1263.17, 
1200.37, 1054.8, 971.4, 936.4, 968.57, 897.93, 1099.87, 876.43, 
1095.47, 1132, 774.4, 1075.13, 982.57, 947.33, 1096.97, 929.83, 
1246.9, 1398.2, 1063.83, 1223.73, 1174.37, 1248.5, 1171.63, 1280.57, 
1183.33, 1016.23, 1082.1, 795.37, 900.83, 1159.2, 992.5, 967.3, 
1440, 804.13, 418.17, 559.57, 563.87, 562.97, 1113.1, 954.87, 
883.8, 1207.1, 1046.83, 995.77, 803.93, 1036.63, 946.9, 887.33, 
727.97, 733.93, 979.2, 1176.8, 1241.3, 1435.6)

What is the minimum number of elements that when added consecutively (as in the order within the vector) would sum up to lets say 20000

To be more clear i need the following: Start with ev[1] and add consecutively up to 20000. Record the number of elements you had to add in order to get to 20000 as r[1]. Then start with ev[2] and add till 20000 and so on. Recored the number of elements you had to add till 20000 as r[2]. Do this for the entire length of ev. Then return the min(r)

For example

j<-c(1, 2, 3, 5, 7, 9, 2).

I want the minimum number of elements that when added consecutively would give lets say >20. This should be 3 (5+7+9)

Thanks a lot

share|improve this question
    
This is really a duplicate of: stackoverflow.com/questions/8539303/… – 42- Dec 16 '11 at 21:19
    
No its not. Its just an attempt to come arround some problems and answer my previous question – ECII Dec 16 '11 at 21:34
    
Don't you want to find the minimum consecutive sequence of numbers that sum to 20000? Consider c(1,2,19999,0,0,55). Your stated algorithm would answer 3 (1,2,19999) instead of 2 (2,19999)? – Tommy Dec 16 '11 at 21:34
    
Tommy: The answer would be 2 in the example you mention. Can you help me programm it? – ECII Dec 16 '11 at 21:37
1  
@ECII - Well OK, since it's Friday ;-) – Tommy Dec 16 '11 at 22:23
up vote 4 down vote accepted

Well, I'll give it a shot: This one will find the length of the minimum sequence of numbers that add up to or above max. It makes no claims to be fast, but it has O(2n) time complexity :-)

I made it return both the start index and the length.

f <- function(x, max=10) {
  s <- 0
  len <- Inf
  start <- 1
  j <- 1
  for (i in seq_along(x)) {
     s <- s + x[i]
     while (s >= max) {
       if (i-j+1 < len) {
         len <- i-j+1
         start <- j
       }
       s <- s - x[j]
       j <- j + 1
     }
  }

  list(start=start, length=len)
  # uncomment the line below if you don't need the start index...
  #len
}

r <- f(ev, 20000) # list(start=245, length=15)
sum(ev[seq(r$start, len=r$length)]) # 20275.42

# Test speed:
x <- sin(1:1e6)

system.time( r <- f(x, 1.9) ) # 1.54 secs

# Compile the function makes it 9x faster...
g <- compiler::cmpfun(f)
system.time( r <- g(x, 1.9) ) # 0.17 secs
share|improve this answer
    
Very nice answer. – Dason Dec 16 '11 at 22:59
    
My respect..... – ECII Dec 16 '11 at 23:28
    
@Dason and ECII - Thanks, but it's just a for-loop ;-) – Tommy Dec 16 '11 at 23:32
library(zoo) # Needed for rollapply
N <- 20000 # The desired sum we want to achieve
j <- 0
for(i in 1:length(ev)){
    k <- rollapply(ev, i, sum)
    j[i] <- max(k)
    if(j[i] >= N){
        break
    }
}
i # contains how many consecutive elements you need to sum (15)
j[i] # contains the corresponding sum(20275.42)

Currently this doesn't tell you where the specific subset occurs in the vector but another use of rollapply could get you that information.

There are other ways to do it but if you have a really long vector this will break out of the loop so you don't calculate more than you need. The basic idea is to use rollapply to create a vector of the consecutive sums of length k and then find the maximum of that. If this is less than what we desire do the same thing for sums of length k+1. Repeat until we find a sum that is larger than the desired threshold.

Edit:

This appears to be about 100x faster. I haven't compared it to Tommy's answer (which is probably faster than this but this will provide a significant speedup compared to my original method.

Edit 2: Moving the [-n] and removing the suppresswarnings speeds this up quite a bit.

myfun <- function(ev, N){
    i <- 1
    n <- length(ev)
    j <- ev
    repeat{
        j <- (j[-n] + ev[-c(1:i)])
        i <- i+1
        n <- n-1
        if(max(j) >= N | i > length(ev)){
            break;
        }
    }
    return(i)
}

myfun(ev, 20000)

# And stealing the idea from Tommy gives a nice speedup as well
myfuncomp <- compiler:cmpfun(myfun)
myfuncomp(ev, 20000)
myfunc3 <- compiler:cmpfun(myfun, options = list(optimize = 3))
myfunc3(ev, 20000)

library(rbenchmark) # For testing
# If you have Tommy's functions loaded as f and g you can compare
benchmark(f(ev, 20000), g(ev, 20000), myfun(ev, 20000), myfuncomp(ev, 20000), myfunc3(ev, 20000))
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you! This is exactly what i needed. Unfortunately its painfully slow for large vectors. Thanks again. – ECII Dec 16 '11 at 22:27
    
@ECII - Is my solution fast (and correct) enough? – Tommy Dec 16 '11 at 22:55
    
@ECII I would recommend accepting the answer Tommy gave. It's a lot nicer and they mentioned compiling it which makes it very fast. – Dason Dec 16 '11 at 22:59
1  
I edited the second version to make it faster. Testing it on my machine has this being slightly faster than Tommy's and compiling with optimize = 3 gives the best out of all the methods I tried. – Dason Dec 17 '11 at 0:15

you mean something like this?

> sum(ifelse(cumsum(ev)<=200000, 1, 0))
[1] 364
share|improve this answer
    
No. Let me explain better. What i want is: Start with ev[1] and add consecutively up to 20000. Record the number of elements you had to add in order to get to 20000 as r[1]. Then start with ev[2] and add till 20000 and so on. Recored the number of elements you had to add till 20000 as r[2]. Do this for the entire length of ev. Then return the min(r) – ECII Dec 16 '11 at 21:18

I think this may be a Traveling Salesman Problem in disguise unless you put in some more constraints. You cannot necessarily start at the max ev and go out in either direction since it may be a local non-dense maximum

x=1:length(ev)
 plot(x,ev)
 lxy <- loess(ev~x )
 lines(predict(lxy, x=1:length(y)))
 title(main="loess() fit of ev")

enter image description here

But in the region of the most dense values the values are fairly flat.

 x=1:length(y); y=c(356.83, 
 973.5, 0, 240.43, 1232.07, 1440, 1329.67, 1096.87, 1331.37, 1305.03, 
 1328.03, 1246.03, 1182.3, 1054.53, 723.03, 1171.53, 1263.17, 
 1200.37, 1054.8, 971.4, 936.4, 968.57, 897.93, 1099.87, 876.43, 
 1095.47, 1132, 774.4, 1075.13, 982.57, 947.33, 1096.97, 929.83, 
 1246.9, 1398.2, 1063.83, 1223.73, 1174.37, 1248.5, 1171.63, 1280.57, 
 1183.33, 1016.23, 1082.1, 795.37, 900.83, 1159.2, 992.5, 967.3, 
 1440, 804.13, 418.17, 559.57, 563.87, 562.97, 1113.1, 954.87, 
 883.8, 1207.1, 1046.83, 995.77, 803.93, 1036.63, 946.9, 887.33, 
 727.97, 733.93, 979.2, 1176.8, 1241.3, 1435.6)

 lxyhi <- loess(y~x)
 plot(x,y)
 lines(predict(lxyhi, x=1:length(y)))

enter image description here

share|improve this answer
1  
nice graphs... But since the stated problem is to find consecutive numbers that add up to a value, I don't see why it would be an NP-complete problem (as the travelling salesman is). – Tommy Dec 16 '11 at 23:18
    
Trying to define the region is not easy. Where you should be extending the index of the interval cannot be determined without a global search. – 42- Dec 17 '11 at 0:10
    
I must admit to being a bit lost here - I'm not a statistician, but the way I see the problem (and the way I solved it) was with a (rather) simple for-loop. Are you saying that that algorithm is wrong? If so, I'd like to understand the circumstances where it fails! – Tommy Dec 17 '11 at 0:23
    
I don't think not being a statistician (which I'm not either) is a problem. I was just saying you needed to a global search, but I guess yours is, and it out-performs my effort to apply a density()-based strategy. + to you. – 42- Dec 17 '11 at 0:51

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