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New to Java here, please help. How arguments are passed in java? Why am I unable to change argument value in the calling method from within called method?

Code

public class PassTest {
    public static void changeInt(int value)
    {
         value=55;
    }

    int val;
    val=11;
    changeInt(val);
    System.out.println("Int value is:" + val);// calling modifier changeInt 
}

Output

Int value is: 11

why it is not 55..?

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1  
This code won't even compile –  stacker Dec 16 '11 at 21:33
    
just a snippet..not complete..needed to ask question here.. –  sum2000 Dec 16 '11 at 21:35
    
@stacker i don't think code that compiles is required to ask a question –  Andy Pryor Dec 16 '11 at 21:52
    
possible duplicate of Does Java pass by reference? –  Andy Thomas Dec 16 '11 at 22:00
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5 Answers 5

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Java passes ByValue, meaning the value of the object you put as a parameter is passed, but not the object itself, therefore

val=11;
changeInt(val);

does the exact same thing as

int val=11;
int val2=val
changeInt(val2);

int is a primitive, primitives don't "wrap" a value, you could try to use an Integer class, or make your own class that stores an integer, and then change that classes integer value. Instances of an object are sometimes passed ByReference if setup right. here is an example

MyStringClass.java

public class MyStringClass{

    private String string = null;

    public MyStringClass(String s){
        string = s;
    }
    public String getValue(){
        return string;
    }
    public void setValue(String s){
        string = s;
    }
}

and then the workings

public static void addTo(String s){
    s += " world";
}
public static void addTo(MyStringClass s){
    s.setValue(s.getValue() + " world");
}
public static void main(String[] args){
    String s = "hello";
    MyStringClass s1 = new MyStringClass("hello");
    addTo(s);
    addTo(s1);
    System.out.println(s);//hello
    System.out.println(s1);//hello world
}

I would wonder why you need to change the value instead of just returning it? isn't it easier?

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oh..ok i got the whole point clearly...thanks for the answer.. –  sum2000 Dec 17 '11 at 8:14
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Java passes by value, not by reference. In your method value contains a copy of the value from val. Modifying the copy does not change the original variable.

You could pass an int wrapped inside an object if you want your changes to be visible to the caller. You can for example use the class org.apache.commons.lang.mutable.MutableInt.

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can you be more specific.? –  sum2000 Dec 16 '11 at 21:31
4  
Err... More specific about what? Can you be more specific? –  Mark Byers Dec 16 '11 at 21:33
    
"You could pass an int wrapped inside an object if you want your changes to be visible to the caller. " exactly what this means.? –  sum2000 Dec 16 '11 at 21:36
1  
Can you both specify the specificity of the specific context in question? Specifically the part about how "Modifying the copy does not change the original variable" is not specific. Seems right to me Mark, +1. –  Travis J Dec 16 '11 at 21:38
    
@SUMEETJAIN: If you have a class that contains a mutable int (for example the MutableInt class from Apache Commons, or a custom class that you wrote yourself) and you pass this to a method then changes to the integer inside the class can be seen by the caller. See this example code online: ideone.com/urhzi –  Mark Byers Dec 16 '11 at 21:48
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Java passes by Value, it makes a copy which is completely dis-associated with the original variable reference, which means it doesn't have access to change the original int. This is true for primitives as well as object references as well.

You can use AtomicInteger or something like it, to achieve what you are desiring to do.

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Primitive variables are passed by value not reference as you are suggesting.

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2  
All variables are passed by value, not just primitive. –  JB Nizet Dec 16 '11 at 21:33
2  
That is true but in the case of an object the value is the reference. I just didn't want to confuse the OP with a lengthy explanation. –  Jasoneer Dec 16 '11 at 21:36
    
@JB Nizet; Java can pass by reference, you pass a pointer to an object instead of the value itself, that allows you to edit the values. not ALL variables are passed by value. –  D3_JMultiply Dec 16 '11 at 22:01
1  
@D3_JMultiply: The pointer is still passed by value. If you make the argument point to another object, the original variable still points to the old object. See stackoverflow.com/questions/40480/is-java-pass-by-reference –  JB Nizet Dec 16 '11 at 22:29
1  
@D3 Not true. If you pass an object by reference you can change the reference to a completely different object and you'll see the effect when returning from the function. Now try that in Java. The link is correct though - but then it disagrees with your interpretation completely. –  Voo Dec 17 '11 at 0:54
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As others said, Java passes byValue by default which means that you are just getting a copy in the function. You can pass byReference, which will pass a pointer to the object and allow you to directly edit but this is not seen as best practice. I would suggest doing it like this:

public class PassTest {
 public int changeInt(int value)
 {
  value = 55;
  return value;
 }
int val;

val=11;
val = changeInt(val);
System.out.println("Int value is:" + val);// calling modifier changeInt 
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